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Fun Fact Friday

  • More than one-third of married couples in Canada sleep in separate bedrooms. 
  • Having a low opinion of yourself is not modesty. It’s self-destruction. 
  • People who eat fish at least once a week have thicker, stronger and more resilient brains.
  • 71% of breakups happen because of mood swings.
  • Every year, about 86,000 people are injured by tripping over their pets. 

 

ingredient_label
Ranch dressing (and many other foods) contain titanium dioxide to keep it white
– Titanium dioxide is also used in most sunscreens and might be a carcinogen.
  • When soft music is playing in the background, people are able to focus better.
  • Kissing can increase your lifespan.
  • Studies have proven that driving in city traffic is just as stressful as participating in extreme sports like skydiving.
  • Ranch dressing contains titanium dioxide to keep it white – Titanium dioxide is also used in most sunscreens and might be a carcinogen.
Happy Friday!

 source: https://twitter.com/faccccct
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Fun Fact Friday

Cats are afraid of water because their ancestors lived in an area 
with very few large bodies of water 
and never had to learn how to swim
 
If it takes less than five minutes to do, do it immediately …
your life will instantly become much more 
organized and productive
 
Music can repair brain damage and returns lost memories
 
Over thinking can cause hair loss

overthinking bald

 

4.8 billion people own mobile phones 
whereas only 4.2 billion own a toothbrush
 
Angry people produce more unique ideas faster
 than people in any other type of emotional state, 
according to a study
 
Mosquitoes have killed more humans 
than all the wars in history
 
Lonely people take longer, hotter showers or baths
 to replace the warmth they’re lacking socially or emotionally
 
Everyone has a song in their playlist 
which they always skip, but never delete
Happy Friday  🙂
source:       factualfacts.com       https://twitter.com/Fact       @Fact


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Cat Parasite May Be Tied to Human Mental Disorders

WebMD News from HealthDay

June 8, 2015 – Could a common cat parasite put people with a weakened immune system at risk for schizophrenia and other types of mental illness?

CBS News reports that new research suggests such a possible link, but doesn’t prove a cause-and-effect connection.

More than 60 million people in the United States have the Toxoplasma gondiiparasite, but most never experience any symptoms. But in people with a weakened immune system, T. gondii can cause an illness called toxoplasmosis and potentially lead to miscarriages and fetal problems in pregnant women, long-lasting flu-like illness, blindness and even death, CBS News reported.

Previous research had linked T. gondii with schiziophrenia and bipolar disorder, and two recent studies provide further possible evidence of a connection between the parasite and mental illness, the news network said.

In a paper published in the journal Schizophrenia Research, investigators analyzed three previous studies and found that exposure to cats during childhood may be a risk factor for mental disorders late in life, CBS News reported.

“Cat ownership in childhood has now been reported in three studies to be significantly more common in families in which the child is later diagnosed with schizophrenia or another serious mental illness,” E. Fuller Torrey, of the Stanley Medical Research Institute, and Dr. Robert Yolken, of Stanley Laboratory of Developmental Neurovirology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said in a news release.

child & cat

In a second paper, researchers analyzed 50 published studies and found a potential link between T. gondii and mental disorders. They saw that people infected with the parasite had a nearly two times increased risk of developing schizophrenia. The researchers also found a possible association between T. gondii and addiction and obsessive-compulsive disorders, CBS News reported.

“In schizophrenia, the evidence of an association with T. gondii is overwhelming,” A.L. Sutterland, who’s with the Department of Psychiatry at the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam, Holland, and colleagues said in a press release, CBS News reported. “These findings may give further clues about how T. gondii infection can possibly [alter] the risk of specific psychiatric disorders.”

Their study was published in the journal Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica.

“Children can be protected by keeping their cat exclusively indoors and always covering the sandbox when not in use,” Torrey told CBS News in an email.

Change your cat’s litter box daily and avoid feeding cats raw or undercooked meat, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises. When changing the litter box, it’s best to wear disposable gloves and wash hands thoroughly with soap and water afterwards. Pregnant women should not clean litter boxes.

source: WebMD


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Cat and dog flea treatments can be toxic to pets, humans

CBC Marketplace investigates risks to humans and pets from popular pet products

By Megan Griffith-Greene / Marketplace, CBC News Dec 05, 2014 

CBC Marketplace has discovered that more than 2,000 animals are reported to have died in North America since 2008 as a result of exposure to flea and tick treatment products, which can contain dangerous chemicals that kill fleas but can also harm pets.

Some researchers are also concerned that pesticide exposures from flea treatments could have consequences for humans, especially small children.

“It’s one of those things that is incredibly unfair — it’s unfair for families, it’s unfair for their pets, it’s unfair for kids. And the truth is, there are better options,” public health scientist Miriam Rotkin-Ellman told Marketplace co-host Erica Johnson.

“We don’t need to put our kids at risk, don’t need to put our families at risk, our pets at risk.”

According to information Marketplace obtained from the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), Health Canada received 4,726 incident reports for cats and dogs related to topical flea treatments between 2009 and 2013.

Pesticides in flea collars ‘can get on the bedding, it can get on kids’ hands, it can go all sorts of places,’ public health scientist Miriam Rotkin-Ellman told Marketplace co-host Erica Johnson.

Health Canada receives reports about incidents related to Canadian products used domestically and in the United States. Almost two thirds (62 per cent) of these reports were for animals in Canada.

The deaths included 1,188 cats and 872 dogs, most of them in the United States.

Flea treatments can include collars, sprays, powder, shampoos and “spot-on” treatments, where pet owners dab a small amount of chemical directly onto the animal’s fur. Some of the treatments contain pesticides that target the nervous systems of fleas and ticks.

Spot-on treatments are responsible for approximately 80 per cent of the incidents, according to the PMRA. Most of the reports involve over-the-counter treatments.

Marketplace also investigated how pesticides in flea collars can transfer from the collar to elsewhere in the home, which could raise special concerns for families with small children.

“There’s mounting evidence that pesticides can be really harmful for kids at low levels,”
says Rotkin-Ellman.
“When pesticides are on pets, they come into contact with kids all the time.”

The investigation, “Paws for Concern,” aired Friday, Dec. 5 at 8 p.m. (8:30 p.m. NT) on CBC Television. The show also tested dog harnesses, evaluating popular brands on the market to see if they actually work in an accident.

CBC Marketplace: Pet Safety – Paws for Concern

child & cat

Dangers to small pets

Pet owners need to be extremely careful in how they choose flea treatments and how they use them on their pets, says Dr. Whitney Chin, a London, Ont.-based veterinarian.

Dr. Chin says one chemical common in over-the-counter dog treatments — permethrin — is of particular concern. Using too much of the chemical can be dangerous, and it is highly toxic to cats.

“I’ve seen it far too many times, unfortunately,” Dr. Chin says.

Some dog flea treatments contain chemicals that are highly toxic to cats. “People should be aware,” says veterinarian Dr. Whitney Chin. (Geoff Wiggins)

“Some people think, A cat is a small dog and I’ll just use a little dose,” Dr. Chin says.

Cats can also be inadvertently exposed if a dog in the home is treated with a product and “the dog or cat socialize, share the same bedding or if the cat grooms the dog.”

Chemicals transferred in this way can be enough to seriously harm a cat, he says.

According to the website of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA), “Toxicity [to cats] from dog flea and tick products is a medical emergency.”

Symptoms of exposure can include uncontrollable shaking, and the CVMA advises taking affected animals to a vet immediately. “The longer your cat is left to shake, the greater the chance of permanent damage (death included).”

Dr. Chin advises talking to your veterinarian before choosing a treatment product, and says that not all products on the market are dangerous.

New labelling rules

New labelling rules came into effect in Canada in 2012, requiring some treatments for dogs to show a clear warning label that the product can be toxic to cats.

However, products manufactured before the new rules were introduced were not recalled and may still be on the market.

Marketplace found treatments on store shelves in fall 2014 that did not have the new labels. Health Canada says it will investigate these cases.

Dr. Chin is concerned that the new warning labels do not go far enough and should more prominently alert pet owners to the dangers of poisoning.

Pet store staff may not always tell people who have both dogs and cats about the risks of exposure to both animals.

“People should be aware,” Dr. Chin says.

Human health concerns

Some researchers are concerned that pesticides in flea collars can also pose a risk to people, even when used properly.

Rotkin-Ellman at the U.S. Natural Resources Defense Council tested pets to see how much pesticide from flea collars the rest of us may be exposed to.

“Flea collars are designed to release a toxic substance that kills fleas on the pet’s fur,” she says. However, she says, “it also can get on the bedding, it can get on kids’ hands, it can go all sorts of places.”

Her team tested pesticide residues left on fur after monitoring a pet that wore a flea collar for three days.

“We found much higher levels than we expected,” she says.

The team found that kids could be exposed to higher levels than are considered safe by the Environmental Protection Agency. This was a particular concern for small children, who could be exposed to chemicals absorbed through their skin, or if they put their hands in their mouths.

Rotkin-Ellman says that exposure to the types of pesticides used in flea collars may be linked to behavioural problems, cognitive delay and problems with motor development.

She advises people who are concerned about pesticide exposure that there are other ways to control fleas, including bathing your pet and washing bedding regularly.

Based on a Marketplace investigation by Tiffany Foxcroft and Tyana Grundig

source: www.cbc.ca