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5 Ways to Boost Your Energy with Food

The most common complaint I hear from people is that they are exhausted or have low energy. Fortunately, there are some simple ways you can give your energy a significant boost. Here are some of my favorites:

Give Your Mitochondria a Boost: Coenzyme Q10 is a naturally-occurring substance in our bodies and in some foods that is necessary to provide energy to our cells. Inside our cells there is a micro-sized energy manufacturing facility known as the mitochondria. Mitochondria depend on CoQ10, as it is also called, to boost energy for every cellular function, including brain functions. Unfortunately, this nutrient can become depleted as we age or experience health issues. Coenzyme Q10 is primarily found in legumes, nuts, fish and poultry.

Eat Every 2 to 3 Hours: When we’re busy, rushed or on-the-go, it’s easy to skip meals or go long periods of time between meals—the worst thing you can do for your energy levels. To keep energy high you need to prevent blood sugar spikes and drops since the resulting cascade of hormones causes an energy roller coaster ride. You may feel fine one minute and then exhausted the next. The best and easiest way to maintain balanced blood sugar levels is to eat every two or three hours. It doesn’t need to be a lot of food; just a snack will do. But, you must be consistent.

Eat zinc-rich foods: The mineral zinc is involved in dozens of chemical reactions linked to energy creation in the body, so ensuring your diet has enough zinc is critical to experience an energy boost. Zinc is also necessary for healthy blood, bones, brain, heart, liver and muscles, so if you’re lacking this vital nutrient, you can experience a wide range of deficiency symptoms. Some signs of a zinc deficiency include: acne, brittle nails, infertility, frequent colds or flu, low sperm count or slow hair or nail growth. Zinc is also essential to prostate health. For more information check out my blog “9 Simple Ways to Drastically Reduce Your Prostate Cancer Risk.” Eat zinc-rich foods like sprouts, pumpkin seeds, onions, sunflower seeds, nuts, leafy greens, beets, carrots or peas frequently throughout the day.

pumpkin seeds

To B or Not to B: There are many vitamins found within the B-Complex, including B1, B2, niacin, pantothenic acid, B6, folic acid, B12, B13, B15, B17, choline, inositol, biotin and PABA. It’s not necessary to remember all of their names, but it is important to ensure adequate B vitamin intake to experience more energy. B vitamins are essential for energy production. And, the more stressful your life is, the more your body depletes these vital nutrients. Additionally, if you suffer from seasonal allergies, that’s an additional stressor to your body. Because B vitamins are not manufactured or stored by the body, it’s imperative to get B vitamin-rich foods every day. Some of the best food sources of these nutrients include: brown rice, root vegetables, pumpkin seeds, citrus fruits, strawberries, cantaloupe, kale, green vegetables and legumes. For an added boost, take a B complex supplement (50 or 100 mg) once or twice a day.  Keeping your gut healthy is also essential to proper nutrient absorption.

Ensure that every meal or snack has some protein in it: While many diet programs would have you believe that protein equals meat, the reality is that meat takes a lot of energy to digest and tends to sit in the digestive tract for many hours. There are many other excellent sources of protein, including: pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, legumes like chickpeas or lentils, avocado, nuts like raw walnuts or almonds and coconut milk. The protein causes a consistent release of energy over time and helps to avoid the blood sugar energy crashes most people experience. Did you notice that pumpkin seeds and legumes keep showing up in the foods that help boost energy? When you need a quick energy boost, these foods will help supply numerous vital nutrients.  Check out “Top Vegan Sources of Protein” for more information.

By: Michelle Schoffro Cook       April 1, 2016      Follow Michelle at @mschoffrocook

Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM is a registered nutritionist and international best-selling and 19-time published book author whose works include: 60 Seconds to Slim: Balance Your Body Chemistry to Burn Fat Fast!

To learn more about keeping your gut healthy, check out my blog “5 Reasons Why Your Gut is the Key to Great Health.”


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5 Ways to Boost Your Energy with Food

By: Michelle Schoffro Cook    April 1, 2016     Follow Michelle at @mschoffrocook

The most common complaint I hear from people is that they are exhausted or have low energy. Fortunately, there are some simple ways you can give your energy a significant boost. Here are some of my favorites:

Give Your Mitochondria a Boost: Coenzyme Q10 is a naturally-occurring substance in our bodies and in some foods that is necessary to provide energy to our cells. Inside our cells there is a micro-sized energy manufacturing facility known as the mitochondria. Mitochondria depend on CoQ10, as it is also called, to boost energy for every cellular function, including brain functions. Unfortunately, this nutrient can become depleted as we age or experience health issues. Coenzyme Q10 is primarily found in legumes, nuts, fish and poultry.

Eat Every 2 to 3 Hours: When we’re busy, rushed or on-the-go, it’s easy to skip meals or go long periods of time between meals—the worst thing you can do for your energy levels. To keep energy high you need to prevent blood sugar spikes and drops since the resulting cascade of hormones causes an energy roller coaster ride. You may feel fine one minute and then exhausted the next. The best and easiest way to maintain balanced blood sugar levels is to eat every two or three hours. It doesn’t need to be a lot of food; just a snack will do. But, you must be consistent.

Eat zinc-rich foods: The mineral zinc is involved in dozens of chemical reactions linked to energy creation in the body, so ensuring your diet has enough zinc is critical to experience an energy boost. Zinc is also necessary for healthy blood, bones, brain, heart, liver and muscles, so if you’re lacking this vital nutrient, you can experience a wide range of deficiency symptoms. Some signs of a zinc deficiency include: acne, brittle nails, infertility, frequent colds or flu, low sperm count or slow hair or nail growth. Zinc is also essential to prostate health. For more information check out my blog “9 Simple Ways to Drastically Reduce Your Prostate Cancer Risk.” Eat zinc-rich foods like sprouts, pumpkin seeds, onions, sunflower seeds, nuts, leafy greens, beets, carrots or peas frequently throughout the day.

pumpkin seeds

To B or Not to B: There are many vitamins found within the B-Complex, including B1, B2, niacin, pantothenic acid, B6, folic acid, B12, B13, B15, B17, choline, inositol, biotin and PABA. It’s not necessary to remember all of their names, but it is important to ensure adequate B vitamin intake to experience more energy. B vitamins are essential for energy production. And, the more stressful your life is, the more your body depletes these vital nutrients. Additionally, if you suffer from seasonal allergies, that’s an additional stressor to your body. Because B vitamins are not manufactured or stored by the body, it’s imperative to get B vitamin-rich foods every day. Some of the best food sources of these nutrients include: brown rice, root vegetables, pumpkin seeds, citrus fruits, strawberries, cantaloupe, kale, green vegetables and legumes. For an added boost, take a B complex supplement (50 or 100 mg) once or twice a day.  Keeping your gut healthy is also essential to proper nutrient absorption. To learn more about keeping your gut healthy, check out my blog “5 Reasons Why Your Gut is the Key to Great Health.”

Ensure that every meal or snack has some protein in it: While many diet programs would have you believe that protein equals meat, the reality is that meat takes a lot of energy to digest and tends to sit in the digestive tract for many hours. There are many other excellent sources of protein, including: pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, legumes like chickpeas or lentils, avocado, nuts like raw walnuts or almonds and coconut milk. The protein causes a consistent release of energy over time and helps to avoid the blood sugar energy crashes most people experience. Did you notice that pumpkin seeds and legumes keep showing up in the foods that help boost energy? When you need a quick energy boost, these foods will help supply numerous vital nutrients.  Check out “Top Vegan Sources of Protein” for more information.

Dr. Michelle Schoffro Cook, PhD, DNM is a registered nutritionist and international best-selling and 19-time published book author whose works include: 60 Seconds to Slim: Balance Your Body Chemistry to Burn Fat Fast!


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8 Reasons You Have No Energy

By Brianna Steinhilber  3/10/2015

Stuck in a midday slump? Change these habits right now for an instant energy boost.

You’d be hard-pressed to find someone who doesn’t hit snooze or experience the midafternoon slump every once in a while, but if you constantly feel like you’re dragging it may be time to take a closer look at your routine. If you don’t have a related health condition and are getting enough shuteye each night, you may be to blame for the constant fatigue. Here are 8 energy-zapping habits that you can change today.


1. You’re eating too much sugar. While the candy jar is an obvious culprit, refined carbohydrates like white bread and rice, chips, and cereal are a major source of sugar, too. This type of simple sugar is digested quickly by the body, leading to a dip in blood sugar levels that leaves you feeling fatigued. Be sure to replace refined carbs with whole grain varieties for a lasting energy boost.


2. You aren’t exercising enough. It may seem counterintuitive that exerting energy will actually increase it, but adding a workout to your daily routine will give you a short-term energy boost. Plus, regular exercise improves sleep quality, which will ultimately leave you feeling more well rested.

3.  You’re skipping breakfast. “Skipping breakfast can definitely contribute to low energy in the morning,” says Johannah Sakimura, MS and Everyday Health blogger. “It’s important to give your body good fuel to start the day after an extended period of fasting.” Without this fuel, your body is running on empty – leaving you famished by lunchtime and more likely to make unhealthy choices that will cause that midafternoon dip in blood sugar. “Try to combine healthy carbohydrates, like fruit, veggies, and whole grains, with a protein source, such as eggs, nuts, or dairy. The carbs give you an initial boost, and the protein helps sustain you until your next meal,” says Sakimura.

lack of energy

4. You’re sitting too much. Not only is sitting for prolonged periods of time harmful to your health (just one hour of sitting affects your heart!), but it’s a major energy zapper as well. Standing up and moving for even a few minutes helps get your blood circulating through your body and increases the oxygen in your blood, ultimately sending more oxygen to your brain which increases alertness. If you work a desk job, try this move more plan to keep your blood pumping.

5. You’re drinking too much caffeine. Whether it’s a can of soda or constant refills of your coffee mug, many of the beverages we reach for when we feel tired are packed with caffeine – a stimulant that will give you a quick jolt, but can also leave you crashing soon after if you ingest too much. Plus, if you’re drinking caffeinated beverages into the afternoon, they may start to have an effect on your sleep quality. If you’re a coffee drinker, switch to water late-morning and replace soda with seltzer for a bubbly afternoon pick-me-up without the crash.

6. You’re dehydrated. We all know the importance of drinking enough water – and even mild dehydration can have adverse effects on your energy level, mood, and concentration. Aim for at least one glass of water per hour while sitting at your desk, and be sure to fill your bottle up even more if you’re doing strenuous activity or are outdoors in high temperatures.


7. You have poor posture. A study found that slouched walking decreased energy levels while exacerbating symptoms of depression. The good news: Simply altering body posture to a more upright position instantly boosted mood and energy, while enabling participants to more easily come up with positive thoughts. So sit up straight! Set reminders on your phone or calendar throughout the day to remind yourself to check in with your posture and straighten up.

8. You’re not snacking smart. If you’re running to the vending machine for a quick afternoon snack, your selection – most likely high in simple carbs and sugar – will take your energy levels in the wrong direction. Instead choose a snack that has a combo of protein and complex carbs for an energy boost that will last throughout the afternoon. Think trail mix, veggies and hummus, or peanut butter on whole wheat toast.


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The Best Foods to Fight Fatigue

Exhaustion isn’t a good look on anyone, but it’s all too easy to burn the candle at both ends in the always-connected world we live in. And when that energy slump hits, you need help. But that doesn’t mean downing a dozen cups of coffee or reaching into the candy bowl.

Sugar and caffeine will give you a quick rush, but that’s often followed by a crash. So if you’re searching for sustained energy, look for food with complex carbs, protein, and fiber. We put together this cheat sheet of things to eat and drink to beat fatigue—and a few foods that sabotage your efforts to get pumped up.

The Best Foods

1. Water
The next time you’re feeling drained, try guzzling good old H2O. Dehydration may actually be at the root of your fatigue. It can lead to headaches, ruin your concentration, and put you in a sour a mood. So hit the watercooler stat.

2. Chia Seeds
Talk about something small but mighty. Chia seeds help with hydration by absorbing 10 times their weight in water. Plus, they have the right ratio of protein, fats, and fiber to give you an energy boost without a crash.

3. Bananas
Consider this the green light to go bananas when you’re running low on fuel. In one study, researchers discovered that eating bananas worked as well as sports drinks at keeping cyclists fueled. The potassium-packed fruit also includes a bunch of good-for-you nutrients (like fiber and vitamin B6) that you won’t find in a bottle of Gatorade.

4. Quinoa
With all its protein, fiber, and iron, quinoa is the perfect thing to reach for when you’re looking to recharge. And if you need an on-the-go upper, whip up these quinoa muffin bites and grab ‘em before hitting the road.

5. Green Tea
By now, it’s no secret that green tea has a slew of health benefits. You can add putting some pep back in your step to the long list. The combination of caffeine and L-theanine give you energy without the jitters. Bonus: Research suggests that green tea boosts brainpower as well, which may come in handy when you’re down to the wire at work. Take the time to brew the tea yourself because store-bought varieties often have lots of added sugar.

6. Oatmeal
The cozy breakfast food—though, let’s be honest, you can enjoy it any time of the day—will keep energy levels up. That’s because it’s high in fiber and comes with a decent dose protein. Plus, oatmeal has a low glycemic load, a fancy scientific way of saying it stabilizes blood sugar levels. (Just make sure to steer clear of instant oatmeal packets, which can be packed with sugar and salt.) Oatmeal is also super versatile—just take a look at these 30 delicious recipes to keep food boredom at bay.

oats

7. Almonds
Certain kinds of fat are friends, not foes, particularly when you’re talking about replenishing your energy. And almonds are packed with healthy monosaturated fats that are just what your body needs for a pick-me-up.

8. Beans
Beans keep you going thanks to a stellar trio of carbs, protein, and fiber. The protein fills you up, the carbs provide energy, and the fiber helps regulate blood sugar. Black beans in particular are your BFFs when it comes to an energy boost—try this black bean soup recipe next time your tank needs refilling.

9. Whole-Wheat Bread
Your body needs carbs for energy, but not all carbs are created equal. Whole-wheat bread is great for a long-lasting energy kick. It’s is a complex carb, meaning it raises your blood sugar gradually instead of hiking it up at turbo-speed.

Foods to Avoid

1. Honey
Sure, honey has some serious health benefits, but it’s not something you should be reaching for if you’re looking for sustained energy. Adding a few teaspoons to your tea or yogurt will give a quick rush of energy that spikes your blood sugar, which means a crash can follow.

2. Energy Drinks
If you’re looking for a pick-me-up, don’t reach for a Red Bull. Research suggests energy drinks may do little to curb sleepiness. The combination of caffeine and sugar puts your body through the ringer and may just leave you feeling dehydrated and fatigued.

3. White Bread
While complex carbs keep your energy levels in a steady state, simple carbs, like white bread, can take your blood sugar on a rollercoaster ride. Not what you want when you’re keeping a busy schedule.

4. Candy
There’s a reason you’re always hearing about sugar crashes. As anyone who’s made their way through their Halloween loot can attest, an energy low inevitably follows. While sweets may give you a quick hit of energy, it’s only a matter of time before you once again find yourself dragging. After all, candy’s made up of simple carbs and sugar (which spikes blood sugar only to let it drop way back down). How sweet it isn’t.

5. Junk food
It’s a cruel fact of life that the most accessible, easy-to-grab, and oh-so delicious foods wreck havoc on energy levels. Research has found that diets high in processed food tend to lead to weight gain and a more sedentary lifestyle. Talk about a lose-lose situation.

Alexandra Duron            Greatist

source: www.msn.com


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7 Eating Habits That Give You Positive Energy

We are all prone to the occasional slump. Maybe it’s in the middle of the morning or, more commonly, we find ourselves lagging in the mid-afternoon. That’s about the time when the demands of the day begin to catch up with us, and our bodies are telling us we need more energy, some rest or both.

But what if those slumps last longer? What if there is something zapping our positive energy on a more consistent basis? If that’s the case, then something needs to be done about it, and changing our eating habits can certainly go a long way in helping our energy levels.


HERE ARE SEVEN EATING HABITS THAT BOOST POSITIVE ENERGY:


UNDERSTAND THE PROBLEM.

How what we eat and drink can impact our overall energy, but it isn’t a one-size fits all solution. Different people react to different foods and drinks in different ways.

A simple food diary can come very much in handy when we are trying to figure out what is zapping our life force. We should be tracking all of our eating habits, including what we are eating for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks for a few weeks. We should also be tracking what is going on when we are eating and when we are feeling sluggish.

After a few week’s time, we will begin to notice as patterns emerge and can help pinpoint the types of food that enhance our energy levels and the types that deplete it.


START THE DAY PROPERLY

It is a common saying that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and most professionals would agree. Start the day off with a good, nutritious breakfast consisting of whole foods. It not only helps your energy and productivity levels, but it also wards off cravings and crashes later on in the morning.

A breakfast high in protein, such as eggs or ham, while avoiding the sugary cereals and other processed foods, will help to avoid a mid-morning slump.

healthy-breakfast-eggs


HYDRATE FREQUENTLY

Of all the good habits we could take up, this has to be the simplest and nearly the cheapest one; but also the most neglected. Increasing your water intake will pay dividends in your skin, your weight and your general feeling of well-being.

It’s not always easy to tell when we are dehydrated if we are drinking sodas, coffee and other drinks throughout the day. And while yes, those drinks have water content, they are not hydrating to our body and are not fueling it properly. It’s easy to forget to drink water, but a reusable bottle can help us ensure we are getting enough of this required energy boost.


BE AWARE OF HIDDEN SUGARS

Isaac Newton said, “what goes up; must come down.” It is true for things affected by gravity, and it is also very true for our sugar levels. We often experience an immediate burst of energy after eating foods high in suger (if you find this typo, let us know in the comments), but the energy burst is fleeting, and a bigger slump usually follows. In addition to affecting our energy, it affects our mood as well. It is not unusual to find ourselves less patient and more irritable after eating poorly.


SNACK ON THE RIGHT THINGS

Eating smaller portions and more often throughout the day is a good way to keep our energy levels consistent and to sustain our metabolism. We need to learn to shop for good, nutritious snacks and keep them on hand. When we are prepared it is easy ward off a visit to the vending machine and choose to fuel our body more wisely.


CHOOSE HAPPIER FOODS

There are certain foods that are proven to make us feel good. They are full of minerals and goodness, great for the immune system and other bodily functions. There is no secret to choosing foods that not only boost our energy but boost our moods too. Fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads, nuts, and seeds are easily accessible and quick to prepare. Check back in with your food journal and choose the foods that boost your mood, because a better mood leads to better energy.


FINISH THE DAY PROPERLY.

Now that we’ve made it through the day with more energy and feeling good, it’s time to end it properly to prepare us for a better tomorrow. Eat lighter at night and try to avoid snacking. While avoiding sugar throughout the day is wise, it is essential at nighttime because it can interfere with your sleep. And nothing boosts our energy like a good night’s sleep.

There they are, seven small and easy to implement habits that will feed the body, maintain consistent energy levels and help us to avoid those energy and mood zapping crashes that might otherwise plague our days.


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7 Eating Habits That Give You Positive Energy

We are all prone to the occasional slump. Maybe it’s in the middle of the morning or, more commonly, we find ourselves lagging in the mid-afternoon. That’s about the time when the demands of the day begin to catch up with us, and our bodies are telling us we need more energy, some rest or both.

But what if those slumps last longer? What if there is something zapping our positive energy on a more consistent basis? If that’s the case, then something needs to be done about it, and changing our eating habits can certainly go a long way in helping our energy levels.

HERE ARE SEVEN EATING HABITS THAT BOOST POSITIVE ENERGY:

UNDERSTAND THE PROBLEM.

How what we eat and drink can impact our overall energy, but it isn’t a one-size fits all solution. Different people react to different foods and drinks in different ways.

A simple food diary can come very much in handy when we are trying to figure out what is zapping our life force. We should be tracking all of our eating habits, including what we are eating for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks for a few weeks. We should also be tracking what is going on when we are eating and when we are feeling sluggish.

After a few week’s time, we will begin to notice as patterns emerge and can help pinpoint the types of food that enhance our energy levels and the types that deplete it.

START THE DAY PROPERLY

It is a common saying that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and most professionals would agree. Start the day off with a good, nutritious breakfast consisting of whole foods. It not only helps your energy and productivity levels, but it also wards off cravings and crashes later on in the morning.

A breakfast high in protein, such as eggs or ham, while avoiding the sugary cereals and other processed foods, will help to avoid a mid-morning slump.

healthy-breakfast-eggs

HYDRATE FREQUENTLY

Of all the good habits we could take up, this has to be the simplest and nearly the cheapest one; but also the most neglected. Increasing your water intake will pay dividends in your skin, your weight and your general feeling of well-being.

It’s not always easy to tell when we are dehydrated if we are drinking sodas, coffee and other drinks throughout the day. And while yes, those drinks have water content, they are not hydrating to our body and are not fueling it properly. It’s easy to forget to drink water, but a reusable bottle can help us ensure we are getting enough of this required energy boost.

BE AWARE OF HIDDEN SUGARS

Isaac Newton said, “what goes up; must come down.” It is true for things affected by gravity, and it is also very true for our sugar levels. We often experience an immediate burst of energy after eating foods high in suger (if you find this typo, let us know in the comments), but the energy burst is fleeting, and a bigger slump usually follows. In addition to affecting our energy, it affects our mood as well. It is not unusual to find ourselves less patient and more irritable after eating poorly.

SNACK ON THE RIGHT THINGS

Eating smaller portions and more often throughout the day is a good way to keep our energy levels consistent and to sustain our metabolism. We need to learn to shop for good, nutritious snacks and keep them on hand. When we are prepared it is easy ward off a visit to the vending machine and choose to fuel our body more wisely.

CHOOSE HAPPIER FOODS

There are certain foods that are proven to make us feel good. They are full of minerals and goodness, great for the immune system and other bodily functions. There is no secret to choosing foods that not only boost our energy but boost our moods too. Fruits, vegetables, whole grain breads, nuts, and seeds are easily accessible and quick to prepare. Check back in with your food journal and choose the foods that boost your mood, because a better mood leads to better energy.

FINISH THE DAY PROPERLY.

Now that we’ve made it through the day with more energy and feeling good, it’s time to end it properly to prepare us for a better tomorrow. Eat lighter at night and try to avoid snacking. While avoiding sugar throughout the day is wise, it is essential at nighttime because it can interfere with your sleep. And nothing boosts our energy like a good night’s sleep.

There they are, seven small and easy to implement habits that will feed the body, maintain consistent energy levels and help us to avoid those energy and mood zapping crashes that might otherwise plague our days.


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4 Tricks to Avoid the Afternoon Slump

How to steer clear of the late afternoon coffee and cookie trap

By Natalie Ruskin, CBC News       Posted: May 08, 2015 

CBC Health spoke with registered dietitian Cara Rosenbloom and naturopath Hilary Booth.

Choose your lunch wisely

What you eat for lunch directly impacts how you feel later in the afternoon. Many people eat a high carbohydrate lunch but don’t include enough protein. You’ll experience a slump and feel more fatigue later if you’re just eating carbs. Protein is the nutrient that makes you feel fuller longer and also helps carbs break down more slowly so that you feel energized longer.

When you choose your lunch, consider including a good source of protein such as lean chicken, fish or tofu.  Try to include a healthy source of fat, like avocado or almonds. And equally important, select complex carbs like brown rice or sweet potatoes to provide sustained energy rather than white rice or refined carbs like pasta or bread.

Plan ahead for snacks

Steer clear of the late afternoon coffee and cookie trap by preparing your snack in anticipation of the slump. We automatically crave sugar when we feel depleted because sugar provides instant energy. For a snack that sustains energy and delivers better nutrition, think along the lines of raisins with almonds, Greek yogurt with fruit, or hummus with vegetables.

yawn

Increase your water intake

Hydrate! People often confuse hunger cravings with actual thirst. Staying hydrated helps you avoid that sleepy feeling. Adequate water intake is important for cognitive performance, weight loss and chronic disease prevention among other benefits. Make a cup of tea or enjoy water with cucumber, lemon or mint. Keep the beverage unsweetened.

There is not a single level of water intake that can be recommended for everyone: the amount depends on several factors such as metabolism and environmental conditions. What’s important is to remember your body needs water so don’t neglect this vital fluid.

Get outside and move your body

Sitting indoors all day drains energy. Make sure to get up and stretch every hour — stand up during phone calls or do a few stretches at your desk. Step outside even for five minutes to get some fresh air and take a walk. Fresh air, natural light and movement improves cardiovascular and cognitive function so that when you’re back in the office you’ll be more energized and creative.

What is it about natural light that makes us feel better? Direct sunlight exposure increases vitamin D which improves mood. The Canadian Cancer Society suggests that a “few minutes a day of unprotected sun exposure is usually all some people need to get enough vitamin D.”

source: www.cbc.ca