Our Better Health

Diet, Health, Fitness, Lifestyle & Wellness

Research Reveals How A Single Choice Affects Mental Health More Than Medications

3 Comments

“We need to get serious
about the critical role played by nutrition.”

– Julia Rucklidge, Clinical Psychologist

We pretty much all agree that good nutritional habits are vital to good physical health, yes? But what about mental health? Do good nutritional habits translate to a healthier mental state? On the surface, it would make sense. After all, the food that we eat contains nutrients – and these nutrients are transported throughout our entire body via our bloodstream. We already know that the brain requires nutrients to operate effectively…so, yeah, it makes sense.

But is eating right more important to mental health than prescription medicine?

Ah, this is a bit trickier. After all, pharmaceuticals are research-intensive and science-based products that have undergone extensive trial and error, often over a period of multiple years. These same products have earned the coveted “seal of approval” from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)…no easy task to say the least.
But, then again, hasn’t food undergone “testing” too? We’ve been “studying” the effects of food for much, much longer than medicine, haven’t we?

Scientists seem to have a pretty good grasp as to what foods are healthy and unhealthy, so why haven’t there been many hypotheses focused on the mental health/nutrition link? Going back to the underlying question, we could attempt to subjectively rationalize a “yes” or “no” answer, and we may come up with an acceptable (maybe even a good) explanation. Or we could call upon that same scientific method to help us out a bit.

What does the science say?

First, we should get this one out of the way: good nutrition is essential for our mental health, and a myriad of mental health conditions can be affected by nutritional habits. This is THE most important lesson of the entire article. Yes, it is interesting that eating healthy may be more impactful than medication; but understanding that food has a direct impact on our mental health is even more crucial.

The Mental Health Foundation – a preeminent, science-based mental health organization, based in the UK – states:

“One of the most obvious, yet under-recognized factors in the development of major trends in mental health is the role of nutrition…the body of evidence linking diet and mental health is growing at a rapid pace, as well as its impact on short and long-term mental health.”

Just as interesting is the following, again quoting from the Mental Health Foundation:

“…the evidence indicates that food plays an important contributing role in the development, management and prevention of specific mental health problems such as depression, schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Alzheimer’s Disease.”

nutrition



So, what do we know, then? Two important things:

  1.  An overwhelming amount of evidence exists proving that food does have a direct effect on our overall mental health.
  2.  That the food we take in can directly contribute – in ways both good and bad – to both potential and existing mental health conditions.

WHY FOOD IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN MEDICATION

Most rational people accept the notion that medication (e.g. prescription medications, vaccines, etc.) plays an important role – and a positive one – in the prevention and treatment of many different health conditions.

One area that is much more contentious is the impact of pharmaceuticals on mental health. More specifically, whether or not pharmaceuticals simply “mask” symptoms rather than cure the underlying condition – as is the case with many patients suffering from anxiety and/or depression, for example.

Dr. Julia Rucklidge, professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Canterbury, is among the advocates for treating mental health disorders with adequate nutrition, despite having her initial doubts. The research that she has undertaken over years, however, has ultimately led her to a simple, profound conclusion: that “nutrition is a safe and viable way to avoid, treat, and lessen mental illness.”

To emphasize her point, Dr. Rucklidge cites her now-well-known study of ADHD patients. The adult participants were split into two groups: one group received micro-nutrients (i.e. vitamins and minerals), and the second group received a placebo (an inactive ingredient used as a basis of measurement.)

Here’s what she found:

– In eight weeks, twice the number of participants responded favorably in the micro-nutrient group than the placebo group.
– Participants that continued with the micro-nutrient regimen realized positive mental health benefits; the alleviation of symptoms.
– Participants that discontinued the micro-nutrient regimen and reverted back to medication realized worsening symptoms.

Dr. Rucklidge didn’t cease experimental efforts with ADHD patients, and continued testing the impact of micro-nutrients on patients with depression, schizophrenia, bi-polar disorder, and others. Similar to the ADHD study, patients responded favorably to the micro-nutrient regimen.
What does this mean?

It simply means that nutrition is a vital component to not only physical health, but overall mental health. Commonsensical? We’ll let you be the judge of that.

But, if Dr. Rucklidge and her colleagues are correct – and many indicators seemingly point in this direction – it may indeed alter how mental illness is both viewed and treated.

SEPTEMBER 22, 2016
Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Research Reveals How A Single Choice Affects Mental Health More Than Medications

  1. Reblogged this on One Regular Guy Writing about Food, Exercise and Living Past 100 and commented:
    Regular readers know that I have stressed the importance of exercise for the brain. So, this seems a logical corollary that food also affects the brain as well as the body.

    Tony

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s