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Diet, Health, Fitness, Lifestyle & Wellness


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5 Key Reasons to Include Hemp Seed in Your Daily Diet

Christina Sarich BY CHRISTINA SARICH   NOVEMBER 16, 2014

Hemp can be used for almost literally countless things, from building homes to the remediation of contaminated soil. In terms of nutrition, there are 5 specific reasons to keep hemp seeds stocked in your pantry. They are a nutritious power-house that should not be overlooked. In fact, many experts call hemp one of the most nutritionally complete food sources in the world. Read on to find out why:

Health Benefits of Hemp Seeds – Full of Health-Boosting Fatty Acids

These health boosting fats include alpha-lineoleic acid (ALA), a variety of Omega-3 fat, as well as Omega-6. These are ‘essential’ fatty acids, which we need to survive, but that the body does not make, so we must obtain them from our diets.

“LA, LNA and the highly unsaturated fatty acids the body makes from them, are necessary in the most active energy and electron exchanging and oxygen requiring tissues; especially the brain, retina, inner ear, adrenal and testicular tissues. They carry the high energy required by the most active tissues, and ensure very high oxygen availability to them. Life force travels through the body via the essential fatty acids and their derivatives.”

Hemp is full of these essential fatty acids, and they are in the correct proportion of 3:1. (Omega 3: Omega 6).

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Hemp Seeds Contain All 8 Essential Amino Acids and 2 Conditionally Essential Amino Acids

While we need 21 amino acids to survive, eight of these must be obtained from our diets. Many nutrition experts say we need a balance of the right kinds of proteins, too. Hemp contains the correct ratio with edestin at 65% of the protein content, with the other 35% of the protein content being albumin.

Considered the backbone of the cell’s DNA, edestin aids digestion and is relatively phosphorus free. The albumin protein, which is the current industry standard for protein evaluation, is highly digestible and is a major free radical combatant.

Hemp Supplies Your Body with Globulin – Vital for a Healthy Immune System

Hemp seed is the premier plant-seed provider of globulin starting material — the highest in the plant kingdom. Eating hemp seeds will ensure the immune system has the ‘reservoir of immunoglobulin resources needed to make disease-eradicating antibodies’.

Hemp Seeds Reduce Inflammation

Among the other health benefits of hemp seeds, the compounds found within these seeds, such as omega 3 fats, help to reduce inflammation in the body. Inflammation triggers almost every conceivable disease, from obesity, ADD/ADHD, peripheral neuropathy, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, migraines, thyroid issues, dental issues, cancer, and more. Eating hemp seeds can keep all of these diseases at bay.

Hemp Seeds are Used to Make Hemp Milk, One of the Last Non-GMO, Non-Dairy Drinks

Sure, you can try soy-milk, but it will likely be GMO. Hemp milk gives you all the same benefits of eating hemp seed, and without the toxic pesticide residues. Hemp can also be grown with almost no industrial fertilizers, fungicides, herbicides or pesticides. As an added boon, hemp helps to restore soil that has been abused, and adds vital nutrients back to it.

Who wouldn’t want to add a super food like this to their diets? Enjoy the health benefits of hemp seeds today!

Additional Sources: NutritionData.Self


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7 (More) Great Reasons To Add Chia Seeds To Your Diet

BY CAITLIN SAMMONS    JULY 17, 2013

Long before the Ch-ch-ch-chia pet of the 1980’s, the Aztecs and the Mayans used chia seeds as a staple of their everyday diets, alongside corn and beans. “Chia” is the Mayan word for strength, and these ancient peoples understood the important health benefits of these seeds.

The Mayans would grind chia seeds into flour, press them for oil, and drink them mixed with water. Ancient people considered these seeds magical due to their ability to increase stamina and energy for long periods of time. However, once the Spanish conquered Latin America, they introduced their own foods and prohibited the farming of chia.

However, chia seeds have recently made a comeback in modern diets as researchers have discovered the hidden benefits from this ancient super seed. Here are just seven of the various reasons you should add this superfood to your diet today.

1. Pack in your fiber.

The American Dietetic Association recommends 20 to 35 grams of fiber per day, yet most people only consume about half of that. Chia seeds deliver almost 50% of your necessary daily intake, with 11 grams of fiber per ounce. Fiber is necessary for ultimate health, but especially for digestion and weight loss.

2. Trim the fat.

Chia seeds absorb up to 12 times their weight and expand in your stomach, making you feel full and curbing your appetite. Chia seeds help reduce your caloric intake by filling you up and helping lower the energy density of certain foods — ultimately, assisting greatly in weight loss.

3. Get your omega-3s.

Chia seeds are a concentrated sources of omega-3 fatty acids, and they actually have more omega-3s than salmon. Omega-3s are critical for brain health, and chia contains five grams per one ounce serving.

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4. Build your bones.

One ounce of chia seeds has 18 percent of the recommended daily intake of calcium. Chia seeds can help promote better bone and oral health.

5. Boost heart health.

Studies have shown that chia seeds can improve blood pressure and increase healthy cholesterol while lowering bad cholesterol. Chia seeds can help you maintain a healthy heart — a crucial element of your health.

6. Get your phosphorus.

Your body uses phosphorus to synthesize protein and repair cells and tissues. Chia seeds contain 27 percent of your daily value of phosphorus, and can help your body heal and repair itself faster!

7. Fill up faster.

Tryptophan, the amino acid that’s popularly known for making you sleepy, is also found in chia seeds. Not only will it make you want to take a nap, but it also helps regulate appetite, sleep and improve mood.

There are plenty of ways that chia seeds can benefit your overall health, and it’s no wonder that the ancient Aztecs and Mayans regularly consumed them. Adding chia to your diet can be a great way to help with weight loss and get your daily vitamins and nutrients!


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5 Surprising Health Benefits of Hemp

Brandi, selected from Diets in Review     August 17, 2013
  
Hemp has always had trouble stepping out of the shadow of its dirty cousin marijuana. While it is closely related to whacky tobaccy, hemp has microscopic amounts of THC — the chemical in marijuana that gets you high — and eating hemp foods won’t jeopardize your next drug test. The health benefits of hemp are so vast that people are beginning to abandon the antiquated stereotypes of the versatile plant.

Sharon Palmer, author of The Plant Powered Diet, wasn’t wasting her breath when she said, “I think hemp is the next ‘it’ food — it has been for a while.” The hemp seed is bursting with Omega-6 and Omega-3, essential fatty acids that have heart health and anti inflammatory benefits. Hemp seeds are nutty in flavor and breathe life into salads, desserts, yogurts, cereals, and breads. Hemp seeds can be turned into butter, milk, protein powder, finishing oil, and soap.

Unfortunately, Uncle Sam outlawed hemp farming in 1958, a shame when you consider how amazing a crop it is. The plant thrives without pesticides, purifies the soil around it, and kills weeds. The U.S. is the only country that bans industrial hemp farming, quelling what could be an agricultural and financial boon for our indebted country.

Adding hemp foods to your diet is something you should seriously consider, and below are five health benefits of hemp you might not have known.


Five Hemp Health Benefits You Didn’t Know About

=> The protein and fiber in hemp combine to slow digestion, which prevents spikes in blood sugar and therefore sustains your body’s energy. A diet rich in hemp promotes digestive regularity.

=> When sprinkled on your cereal or fruit at breakfast, hemp protein and fiber also help aid in satiety, which will prevent you from snacking and keep you fuller longer.

=> The Omega-3 fatty acids in hemp reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, lower blood pressure, and may even ward off Alzheimer’s disease. Hemp seeds are one of the few Omega-3 sources found in plants.

=> The Omega-6 fatty acids in hemp stimulate skin and hair growth, maintain bone health, regulate metabolism, and help the brain function.

=> Hemp seeds contain essential amino acids, which improves muscle control, mental function, and normal body maintenance of cells, muscle, tissues, and organs.

Sharon Palmer contributed to this report.

source: www.care2.com


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9 Foods That Will Naturally Detox You

BY MARIA GUADAGNO – NOVEMBER 23, 2012 

Think the only way to detox is with a juice cleanse? Think again!

Our bodies are naturally built to detoxify us. Everyday, we eliminate and neutralize toxins through our colon, liver, kidneys, lungs, lymph, and skin. It’s just that, in this day and age, these organs often get over-worked from the constant barrage of toxins from pollution, animal products, and processed foods.

Luckily, Mother Nature has the perfect antidote! 

Below are 9 potent detoxifying foods that support your body’s natural cleansing system…and you don’t have to juice them to get the benefits. You’ll receive benefits just by incorporating more of these foods into your diet: 

Cauliflower
This antioxidant rich cruciferous veggie aids your body’s natural detoxification system and reduces inflammation.

Lentils
This fiber-rich legume aids in elimination, helps lower cholesterol, balances blood sugar, and even increases your energy.

Broccoli
A strong detoxifier, broccoli neutralizes and eliminates toxins while also delivering a healthy dose of vitamins.


Turnip Greens
A potent detoxifier, this cruciferous veggie also has been found to help prevent many types of cancer and is a great for reducing inflammation. 

Grapefruit
This fiber-rich sweet and tangy fruit helps lower cholesterol, prevent kidney stones, and aids the digestive system.

Steel Cut Oats
High in both soluble and insoluble fiber, oats will keep you satiated and your digestive system moving.

Cucumbers
Nutrient dense cucumbers, which are 95% water, help flush out toxins and alkalize the body.

Sunflower Seeds
High in selenium and Vitamin E, sunflower seeds aid the liver’s ability to detox a wide range of potentially harmful molecules. In addition, they help prevent cholesterol build up in the blood and arteries.

Hemp Seeds
These tiny nutritional powerhouses are an excellent source of omega 3 & 6 fatty acids, are an easily digestible plant based protein, have a strong anti-inflammatory effect, and also aid in elimination. 


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TOP 10 VEGETARIAN SOURCES OF PROTEIN

One of the most common myths about the vegetarian diet is that after ditching meat it becomes nearly impossible to meet the suggested guidelines for protein intake.

The USDA recommends that women get about 46 grams of protein a day and men get about 56. Some people, like athletes and pregnant or breastfeeding women, may need more, according to WebMD.

But, thanks in part to initiatives like Meatless Monday, this year, Americans are expected to eat 12 percent less meat and poultry than five years ago, USA Todayreported.

While protein is essential to growth, building muscle, the immune system and heart and respiratory functions, MSNBC explains, meat-free protein has the benefit of generally being lower in calories and fat than the animal variety.

Whether you’re a vegetarian , or not there are lots of tasty meat-free sources of protein that also pack additional health benefits. Read through the list of the top 10 vegetarian sources of protein below and tell us your favorite in the comments.

1. Spirulina
Spirulina is 65-71 percent complete protein compared to beef, which is only 22 percent, and lentils, which is only 26 percent.
In addition to being protein-rich, spirulina is an excellent source of vital amino acids and minerals easily assimilated by your body. You would need to consume only two tablespoons of spirulina as a protein substitute for a meal.

2. Hemp
Protein Content: Seeds, 6 g per ounce; Milk, 2 g per cup
If you’re allergic to soy, or just freaked out by its estrogenic activity, hemp products are your next best bet. Sold as a dairy alternative or as seeds, hemp is one of very few plant proteins that supply you with all the essential amino acids, acids your body can’t produce on its own to build muscle and create more protein. The fatty acids in hemp seeds and hemp milk also boost your immune system, and the crop itself is highly sustainable, growing as fast as 10 feet in 100 days and naturally requiring very few pesticides.

3. Chia Seeds
Protein Content: 4 g per ounce
Though the protein content isn’t as high as some other vegetarian foods out there, chia seeds pack a huge nutritional punch. For starters, they’re an incredible fiber resource with nearly half (11 g) of the amount you need every day in a single ounce. That helps fill you up and eat fewer calories. They also contain 18 percent of your daily calcium requirement, more than triple that of milk, which helps your bones. Chia seeds have no flavor, so you can add a tablespoon to any food you wish to without altering its flavor, and unlike flax, chia seeds don’t need to be ground in order for your body to absorb all the nutrients.

4. Quinoa
Protein Content: 1 cup of cooked quinoa (185 g) contains 8.14 grams of protein.
Quinoa is perhaps one of the most perfect non-animal sources of protein on the planet. What makes quinoa (pronounce keen-wah) unique is that it is the only plant based source of complete protein. “Complete” means that it contains all 9 of the essential amino acids that are crucial to human function and health. It is also a wonderful option for those that follow a gluten free diet, since it is completely gluten free.

 


5. Tempeh
Protein Content: A firmer, chewier cousin of tofu, a half-cup serving of this soybean-based bite has 15 grams of protein. 
Fermented foods ought to be part of everyone’s diet, vegetarian or not. Tempeh is one that is chewy and delicious, even to die-hard burger fans. It’s healthy and a much better bet than heavily processed tofu or “mock meats” that are brimming with poor-quality modified proteins, sodium, chemicals and starchy fillers. In my opinion it doesn’t compare nutritionally or in taste to a juicy steak but as vegetarian options go it ain’t half bad.

6. Almonds and Almond Butter
Protein Content: (between 6 and 8 grams, per handful).
When adding a handful of nuts to your salad for protein, go with almonds. Almond butter is less toxic and allergenic than peanut butter, although the protein amounts are similar by comparison. Still, this is about quality protein, not necessarily the amount. 

7. Veggies
Yep, good old greens will pack a protein punch. One cup of cooked spinach has about 7 grams of protein. The same serving of French beans has about 13 grams. Two cups of cooked kale? 5 grams. One cup of boiled peas? Nine grams. 

8. Lentils and Beans
A cup of iron-rich lentils packs 18 grams of protein, almost as much as three ounces of steak. One cup of chickpeas, contains 15 grams of protein, as does a cup of black or kidney beans. 

9. Organic, Plain, Greek Yogurt (not vegan)
Protein Content: 15 to 20 g per 6-ounce serving
All dairy products are good sources of protein. A glass of milk provides you with 8 g, but Greek yogurt is a protein powerhouse, with twice the protein and half the sugar and carbs of regular yogurt. In fact, Greek yogurt contains the same protein as a three-ounce serving of lean meat. Top that with a handful of nuts and you could get half of your daily protein intake at breakfast. 

10. Eggs (not vegan)
Protein Content: 6 g per egg
There’s a reason the incredible, edible egg is such a popular breakfast choice. The protein in eggs has the highest biological value, a measure of how well it supports your body’s protein needs, of any food, including beef. And the yolks contain vitamin B12, deficiencies of which are common in vegetarian diets and can cause attention, mood, and thinking problems while raising blood homocysteine levels, a risk factor for heart disease, dementia, and Alzheimer’s.

To get the healthiest eggs, find a local producer whose chicken flocks are small and feed off of grass, bugs, and organic grain; studies have shown that E. coli and salmonella contamination in eggs is directly related to the size of the flock.

Sources: 
http://www.mindbodygreen.com…
http://abcnews.go.com/…
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/…
http://www.huffingtonpost.com….


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3 Reasons Why You Should Say Hello to Hemp This Summer

by Kate Geagan MS, RD   06/13/2013 

Looking for a super simple addition you can make to your diet this summer that delivers significant health benefits? Say hello to hemp.

If the thought of eating hemp makes you a little uneasy, rest assured that the edible hemp seeds you see in the store do not contain THC (the psychoactive component of marijuana). In fact, you should think of hemp in the same way you do poppy seeds – which come from the opium plant.

Hemp has rapidly gone mainstream, available in most supermarkets in seeds, powder, milk, butters and oils. And its impressive nutrition prowess makes it worthy of superfood status. Here’s why:

Protein Powerhouse

Hemp seeds are packed with high-quality protein and all the essential amino acids we need. Just 2 tablespoons of hemp hearts provides 5 grams of protein – almost as much as an egg, which has 6 grams.


Good Fats

Hemp is rich in essential fatty acids, such as omega-3 fats, which may help reduce the risk of depression and reduce the clotting factors associated with heart disease. Hemp is also a good source of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), an omega-6 fatty acid that plays an important role in regulating blood pressure and inflammation. Score one more for hemp because hemp hearts offer an almost perfect balance of the omega-6 to omega-3 fats at a 3:1 ratio, making them a wonderful food to include for promoting optimum health.

Vitamin E and More

As with many other seeds, hemp seeds deliver a significant amount of vitamin E, an antioxidant. Magnesium and iron are two other nutrients of note in this mighty little seed.

How to Enjoy Hemp Now:

  • Hemp seeds (also called “hearts”) can easily be added to yogurt, hot or cold breakfast cereal, salads or smoothies.
  • Swap out 1/4 of the flour called for in baking for hemp: cookies, muffins or pancakes can get a nice nutrition boost.
  • Need an extra protein boost before your workout? Try adding a scoop of hemp powder.
  • Toast hemp seeds to make a crust for salmon therefore getting double your dose of omega-3s.
  • For a summer snack blend hemp seeds, chickpeas, lemon juice, garlic, olive oil and cumin to make a hemp hummus: enjoy with a plate of your favorite sliced veggies.
  • Try hemp milk instead of cow’s milk or soy milk.
  • Look for hemp oil in the grocery store-and use in salad dressings drizzled on your favorite stir fry. (Note: Hemp oil is a bit fragile, so it should be stored in a cool, dark place).


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Top 7 Sources of Plant-Based Protein

BY RICH ROLL     APRIL 11, 2012

Contrary to popular belief, it’s not only possible to optimize your health on a plant-based diet; when done right, I actually recommend it. 

But where do you get your protein?

I field this question constantly. Despite deeply ingrained but misleading conventional wisdom, the truth is that you can survive without meat, eggs and dairy. Believe it or not, you can actually thrive, and never suffer a protein deficiency. Because no matter how active your lifestyle, a well-rounded whole food plant-based diet provides more than enough protein to satisfy the body’s needs without all the artery-clogging saturated fats that dominate the typical American diet.

I speak from experience. As a vegan endurance athlete, I place a high tax on my body. And yet my plant-based diet has fueled me for years without any negative impact on building lean muscle mass or recovery. In fact, at age 45 I continue to improve and am as fit, healthy, and strong as I have ever been.

Here’s a list of my top-7 plant-based foods high in protein:

1. Quinoa: 11g Protein / Cup

A grain like seed, quinoa is a high protein alternative to rice or pasta, served alone or over vegetables and greens. It provides a good base for a veggie burger and is also a fantastic breakfast cereal when served cold with almond or coconut milk and berries.


2. Lentils: 17.9g  Protein / Cup

Delicious, nutritious and super easy to prepare. Trader Joe’s sells them pre-cooked and I’m not afraid to just eat them cold right out of the package for lunch or a snack on the run.

3. Tempeh: 24g Protein / 4 Ounces

A fermented soybean-based food, tempeh is a healthy protein-packed alternative to it’s non-fermented cousin tofu. It makes for a great veggie burger and doubles as a tasty meat alternative to meatballs in pasta, or over brown rice and vegetables.

4. Seitan: 24g Protein / 4 Ounces

An excellent substitute for beef, fish and soy products, one serving provides about 25% of your RDA of protein. But not for those with gluten sensitivities, as it is made from wheat gluten.

5. Beans (Black, Kidney, Mung, Pinto): 12-15g Protein / Cup

I love beans. Great on a veggie burrito, in chili and soups, on salads or over rice with vegetables, beans of all varieties are a daily staple of my diet.

6. Spirulina: 6g Protein / 10 grams

A blue-green algae, spirulina is a highly bioavailable complete protein containing all essential amino acids. At 60% protein (the highest of any natural food), it’s a plant-based protein powerhouse that finds it way into my Vitamix blends daily.

7. Hemp Seeds: 16g Protein / 3 Tbsp

With a perfect ration of omega-6 and omega-3 EFA’s, hemp seeds are another bioavailable complete protein rivaled only by spirulina. A simple and great addition to a multitude of dishes, from breakfast cereal to salads to smoothies to vegetables and rice.