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Fun Fact Friday

    • Neurologists claim that every time you resist acting on your anger, you’re actually rewiring your brain to be calmer and more loving.
    • Sleeping on the job is acceptable in Japan, as it’s viewed as exhaustion from working hard.
    • Thinking burns calories.
    • Cuddling triggers the same neurological reaction as taking painkillers.
    • Cotton Candy was invented by a dentist.
    • The brain treats rejection like physical pain, according to scientists.

 

anger
  • Dancing has been proven to build confidence and release stress.
  • 1.6 billion people – a quarter of humanity, live without electricity.
  • A banana is actually a berry and a strawberry isn’t.
  • Age is just a number, maturity is a choice.
  • 11% of the world is left-handed.
  • Regular sex enhances mental performance and increases the production of new neurons in the brain, according to researchers.
    Happy Friday  🙂
    source:       factualfacts.com       https://twitter.com/Fact       @Fact


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Acknowledge Your Anger to Help Prevent Disease

Erin Newman     August 11, 2015

The more we learn about disease, the more we start to realize that there is no separation of body from mind. Treating just the symptoms of a disease does us no good if we are not also changing our mental outlook. For instance, depressed patients with any type of disease, recover more slowly and have worse health outcomes than optimistic patients.

Scientists have also now seen enough cases of “broken heart syndrome,” often brought on by the death of a spouse, that we now have a medical term for it: stress-induced cardiomyopathy. All of this should give us cause for hope, though. It means that we can take charge of our own health, and that we can learn ways to prevent disease in our lives.

It is our mental and physical health, and not our genes, that carries the most weight in determining our health outcomes. To quote Craig Venter, a pioneer in genomic research,

“Everybody talks about the genes that they received from their mother and father, for this trait or the other. But in reality, those genes have very little impact on life outcomes. Our biology is way too complicated for that and deals with hundreds of thousands of independent factors. Genes are absolutely not our fate. They can give us useful information about the increased risk of a disease, but in most cases they will not determine the actual cause of the disease, or the actual incidence of somebody getting it. Most biology will come from the complex interaction of all the proteins and cells working with environmental factors, not driven directly by the genetic code.”

And as one recent study affirms, 90 to 95 percent of cancer is preventable with lifestyle changes, and one of the largest (and as yet least understood) is our mental disposition.

Releasing Anger: The key to prevention?

One study of over 160 women with breast cancer found a significant association between health and the suppression of emotions, most commonly anger. Another study concluded that suppression of anger may have a direct impact on mortality, including deaths from cancer. And yet another study determined that “Emotion-focused coping strategies were significantly associated with survival.”

All of which just means that if we want to live long and healthy lives, we’ve got to learn to express our anger and other emotions.

anger

Ways to tell that you may be suppressing anger or other emotions:

• People tell you that you are always smiling and happy.
• You often feel as if you can’t say no.
• You feel overwhelmed and tense.
• You no longer know what makes you happy, only what makes others happy.
• You worry often about the past or future
• Overeating, drinking, medicating, shopping, or other addictive behaviors

Women, especially, have been taught at an early age that it’s not okay to display anger. “Just who do you think you are, missy?” we might have heard, or later, we might have gotten the distinct message that we don’t want to be seen as a witch with a capital “B.” We may then mask this emotion with a happy face, or by eating, drinking, medications, or other ways to numb the emotion.

What’s behind the anger?

Often, we may not even know that we are angry about something. We might not hear the words that run through our minds about an incident or a person who’s angered us. And, while we may not want to admit it, or may not even recognize it on a conscious level, our anger is usually a mask for other, even less comfortable emotions. Sadness, shame, guilt or regret are often at the heart of our anger at another. These emotions may be even harder to recognize and discover, but when we get down to this level of emotions, then we can really clear them out and make way for love and joy.

Ways of handling anger:

Expressing or handling our anger doesn’t mean venting to others –either at the person that we are angry with or another. We must express the anger in a safe and loving way that allows us to acknowledge the anger and then work through it.

Journaling: Daily journaling is one of the most powerful ways to get in touch with your subconscious mind (which is where many of these suppressed thoughts and emotions may be lurking). This is not a “here’s what I did today” type of journal, but instead a “ this is what’s bothering me” type of journal. Clearly express everything on your mind, including just how you really and truly feel towards a person, whether that be your spouse, your child, a friend, or a parent. Many people worry that others might read their journal; if this is you, burn or shred the paper after writing. (Believe me, you won’t ever want to go back and read it!) I find (and many recommend) that journaling works best in the morning, when your mind hasn’t had time to fill itself up with thoughts of the day yet.

Loving our anger: Part of suppressing emotions is the idea that we should not be feeling a certain way at all, or that we would like for that feeling or thought to go away and leave us alone. If we can instead acknowledge that the feeling or thought is part of us, and allow it to be seen, then it will no longer have as much power to hurt us. Best yet, once we acknowledge the feeling or emotion, we can then direct love to that place in our bodies where we most feel the emotion. (This also seems to work best in the mornings, too, in a space that you can be quiet and still. But if that doesn’t work, then lunch breaks or evenings can be a good time, also.)

If these methods sound too tough or unrealistic, or just something that you can’t fit into your life, then it may help to speak to a professional who can help you to discover your inner emotions. We owe it to ourselves and to the people who love us to live the most emotionally rich and healthy lives as possible!


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Study Shows Seeing Smiles Can Lower Aggression

By Maia Szalavitz  April 04, 2013      

A happy face can certainly lift spirits, but can it reduce rage?

Studies have documented that the physical act of smiling is a universal, and effective way to lift mood, if briefly. But in the latest research on the power of the smile, researchers led by Marcus Munafo of the University of Bristol in England found that even seeing smiles on the faces of others can have a profound effect on a person’s tendency toward violence or aggression— that is, as long as that person recognizes the smile as one of happiness, and not as a sneer.

Munafo and his colleagues conducted a series of experiments involving normal adults as well as highly aggressive teens who had been referred to a youth program, either by educational authorities or the courts. About 70% of the teens already had a criminal record.

In the first experiment, 40 healthy adults, aged 18-30, looked at computer images of faces that had been morphed to show facial expressions that ranged from happy to angry with increasingly difficult to discern expressions in between. Participants were asked how angry they felt and then had to rate the images as displaying either happiness or anger — there was no option for “ambiguous” or “unable to tell.” From these ratings, the scientists were able to generate a score of their biases toward happiness or anger as reflected by where the volunteers decided that happiness ended and anger began.

Previous research found that aggressive people — including violent offenders — tend to interpret even neutral expressions as hostile: “You looking at me?” can easily turn what would have been a nonevent into a tragic confrontation, so preventing such misinterpretations could have important implications.


Based on their initial scores, half of the healthy participants were then told by the computer that some of the ambiguous faces that they had rated as angry should have been scored as happy. This was intended to bias them toward judging the in-between faces more positively. The other 20 received feedback that simply validated their prior choices, creating a control group.

After this training, both groups were tested again and the group that received the biased feedback shifted its ratings of ambiguous faces toward the happy side. Participants were also asked to rate their level of angry feelings again after completing the second round of testing. Those who were trained to interpret ambiguous faces as happier actually reported feeling less angry afterward compared to the controls.

The researchers next focused on the 46 adolescents from the high risk youth program, ranging in age from 11 to 16. These teens completed the same testing, but both the youth and the staff reported on the teens’ levels of aggressive behavior before the testing started and for two weeks afterward. The teens who had been trained to interpret ambiguous facial expressions more positively were significantly less aggressive two weeks later, as rated by both the staff (who did not know which kids were in the intervention group) and by themselves.

“The results of our experiments strongly suggest that biases in the perception of emotional facial expressions play a causal role in subjective anger and aggressive behavior,” the authors conclude.

That doesn’t mean that smiles alone are the answer to violence among adolescents — previous research in which antisocial youth were trained to better recognize emotions, for example, did not have any effect on their level of aggressive behavior. But this earlier study focused on improving teens’ perception of clear facial signals, not ambiguous ones. Since ambiguous signals are more prone to misinterpretation, it may be that violent behavior in some youth is perpetuated by their constant misintepretation of angry expressions where they don’t exist, that push them to combative responses. The findings suggest that helping young people, particularly those who are prone to violence, to learn to give others the benefit of the doubt when they see what they think is a threatening face could help end the vicious cycle of violence.

Maia Szalavitz @maiasz
Maia Szalavitz is a neuroscience journalist for TIME.com and co-author of Born for Love: Why Empathy Is Essential — and Endangered.

source: Time


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4 Ways to Enjoy (Not Just Endure) Holiday Family Gatherings

The holidays mean lots of time spent with family, which can mean lots of opportunities for stress. Whether your brother-in-law insists on talking about politics, your mother probes into your love life, or your Great Aunt Jean picks her teeth at the table, each family gathering is rife with opportunities to lose your cool.

“The irony about spending time with the people you know and love the best is that they also know how to push your buttons the most,” says Kate Hanley, author of The Anywhere, Anytime Chill Guide. You can either clench your jaw and muddle through until it’s time to go home again, or you can try a few mindfulness techniques that can help you stay open-hearted to the people you love, Hanley says. “The only way you can change another person’s behavior is to change the way you react to them—and taking even a few seconds to take a deep breath can help you react more thoughtfully to whatever’s stressing you out.”

Here are four simple remedies—drawn from meditation, yoga, and acupressure—Hanley suggests trying at every family gathering you’ll be attending this holiday season. “Although no one thing can magically transform your family relationships, these tips can help you be more relaxed, less stressed, and less likely to get snippy with the people you love.”

Stand by your mantra.

Before you head to the family gathering, decide which family quirks you’re dreading the most. Then resolve to repeat a calming mantra whenever your stress trigger happens. “Your mantra can be any word or short phrase that’s meaningful to you,” Hanley says. “It could be something formal, like ‘Om’ or ‘Amen,’ or something simple such ‘peace’ or ‘bless his heart.'” Whatever mantra you choose, taking a few moments to repeat it before you react to whatever is pushing your buttons gives you a chance to collect your thoughts—making you less likely to over-react.

How to Stay Healthy at Christmas

Accentuate the positive.

Before you leave for the family gathering (or before you begin getting ready, if you’re hosting), take a few moments to name the parts of the day you’re looking forward to—such as eating Mom’s apple pie, seeing your favorite cousin, or playing with your niece. Then if anything happens to spike your stress levels, make it a point to focus on the things you like. “Changing your focus from something upsetting to something enjoyable can snap you out of a downward spiral in mood,” Hanley says.

Practice the art of letting go.

We all wish we could “get more Zen” around our families, but we can all use a little help because the emotions associated with family are deep-seated and highly charged. There is an acupressure point known as Letting Go that facilitates the release of troublesome emotions, deepens breathing, and promotes relaxation. “Spending a few minutes applying gentle pressure to your Letting Go points can provide a noticeable shift in your mood,” Hanley says. “You can do it in your car before you go inside or even in the bathroom if you need help during the festivities.” To find the Letting Go points, feel the tips of your collarbones on either side of the notch of your throat. Walk your fingers out to where the collarbones end—the Letting Go points are located three finger widths below that end point. With your arms crossed in front of your torso, press two or three fingertips in to the points on either side of your chest and breathe naturally as you do. “You don’t need to go for the burn—think steady but gentle pressure,” Hanley advises. After a minute or two, remove your fingertips slowly and take a couple of breaths before you head back in to the festivities.

Remember your heart.

Whenever you need help staying calm, take a moment to lay one hand over your heart. “This simple gesture shifts your focus away from your swirling thoughts and on to your body—where your deepest wisdom resides—and your heart in particular, which helps you react with love instead of frustration,” Hanley says. “If anyone in your family catches you doing it and looks at you funny, just tell them you have heartburn.”

Kate Hanley is a professional writer who specializes in exploring the mind-body connection.

source: life.gaiam.com


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4 Ways to Enjoy (Not Just Endure) Holiday Family Gatherings

The holidays mean lots of time spent with family, which can mean lots of opportunities for stress. Whether your brother-in-law insists on talking about politics, your mother probes into your love life, or your Great Aunt Jean picks her teeth at the table, each family gathering is rife with opportunities to lose your cool.

“The irony about spending time with the people you know and love the best is that they also know how to push your buttons the most,” says Kate Hanley, author of The Anywhere, Anytime Chill Guide. You can either clench your jaw and muddle through until it’s time to go home again, or you can try a few mindfulness techniques that can help you stay open-hearted to the people you love, Hanley says. “The only way you can change another person’s behavior is to change the way you react to them—and taking even a few seconds to take a deep breath can help you react more thoughtfully to whatever’s stressing you out.”

Here are four simple remedies—drawn from meditation, yoga, and acupressure—Hanley suggests trying at every family gathering you’ll be attending this holiday season. “Although no one thing can magically transform your family relationships, these tips can help you be more relaxed, less stressed, and less likely to get snippy with the people you love.”

Stand by your mantra.

Before you head to the family gathering, decide which family quirks you’re dreading the most. Then resolve to repeat a calming mantra whenever your stress trigger happens. “Your mantra can be any word or short phrase that’s meaningful to you,” Hanley says. “It could be something formal, like ‘Om’ or ‘Amen,’ or something simple such ‘peace’ or ‘bless his heart.'” Whatever mantra you choose, taking a few moments to repeat it before you react to whatever is pushing your buttons gives you a chance to collect your thoughts—making you less likely to over-react.


Accentuate the positive.

Before you leave for the family gathering (or before you begin getting ready, if you’re hosting), take a few moments to name the parts of the day you’re looking forward to—such as eating Mom’s apple pie, seeing your favorite cousin, or playing with your niece. Then if anything happens to spike your stress levels, make it a point to focus on the things you like. “Changing your focus from something upsetting to something enjoyable can snap you out of a downward spiral in mood,” Hanley says.

Practice the art of letting go.

We all wish we could “get more Zen” around our families, but we can all use a little help because the emotions associated with family are deep-seated and highly charged. There is an acupressure point known as Letting Go that facilitates the release of troublesome emotions, deepens breathing, and promotes relaxation. “Spending a few minutes applying gentle pressure to your Letting Go points can provide a noticeable shift in your mood,” Hanley says. “You can do it in your car before you go inside or even in the bathroom if you need help during the festivities.” To find the Letting Go points, feel the tips of your collarbones on either side of the notch of your throat. Walk your fingers out to where the collarbones end—the Letting Go points are located three finger widths below that end point. With your arms crossed in front of your torso, press two or three fingertips in to the points on either side of your chest and breathe naturally as you do. “You don’t need to go for the burn—think steady but gentle pressure,” Hanley advises. After a minute or two, remove your fingertips slowly and take a couple of breaths before you head back in to the festivities.

Remember your heart.

Whenever you need help staying calm, take a moment to lay one hand over your heart. “This simple gesture shifts your focus away from your swirling thoughts and on to your body—where your deepest wisdom resides—and your heart in particular, which helps you react with love instead of frustration,” Hanley says. “If anyone in your family catches you doing it and looks at you funny, just tell them you have heartburn.” 

Kate Hanley is a professional writer who specializes in exploring the mind-body connection.


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These 3 Flowers Ought to Kick Your Insomnia

Blackout curtains still not doing the trick? We uncovered studies that show how certain plants can deepen sleep and stop tossing and turning.

For light sleepers: Jasmine
Place one of these varieties on your nightstand and experience a deeper REM cycle: Jasminum polyanthum (a vinelike plant with tiny flowers; see right)
or Grand Duke of Tuscany, a variety of Jasminum sambac (a more shrublike strain) that grows fragrant, roselike blossoms.



For stressed sleepers: Lavender
This plant’s flowery aroma slows heart rate and lowers blood pressure. In one study, scientists sprinkled lavender oil or an unscented placebo on the bedsheets of 12 female insomniacs and found that the women with lavender-scented sheets slept better and woke up feeling refreshed.

For fitful sleepers: Gardenia
This sweet-scented bud soothes uneasy sleepers. Ayurvedic doctors even prescribe it to manage anger and impatience.


Sources: apartmenttherapy.com, freewebs.com    Readers Digest


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25 Meals to Boost Your Mood

by Shana Lebowitz     April 2012
The milkshake may bring all the boys to the yard, but it won’t do much for our happiness levels. While a sweet treat may seem the obvious way to perk up, a nutritious diet’s a better bet for a good mood that lasts way after that sugar high wears off. From breakfast smoothies to salmon salad, the 25 meals below are tasty ways to feel mmm-mmm good.

Breakfasts

1. Fortified whole-grain cereal with low-fat milk and blueberries
Fights depression
The cereal’s fortified with vitamin B, which studies have linked to good mental health[1]. Plus recent research suggests people who slurp down vitamin D in a serving of milk don’t just build strong bones — they’re also less likely to get depressed. And those berries may be blue, but they keep us from feeling that way[2]. So get crunching tomorrow morning. Even a soggy bowl says smile!

2. Banana-almond-flax smoothie
Fights depression and stress
Slurp some happiness on the go with a smoothie that does wonders for the mood and the taste buds. The potassium in bananas is a super stress-buster; plus nuts and flaxseed are great sources of omega-3s, which may help fight depression[3].

3. Buckwheat pancakes with sliced banana
Beats stress
Whether they’re for breakfast or dinner, pancakes can almost always brighten up a bad day. And there’s science behind it, too: Buckwheat pancakes pack flavonoids that may help reduce stress (at least in mice). Top the stack with some sliced banana, filled with potassium, another stress-buster!

4. Full-fat Greek yogurt with honey and granola
Fights depression, boosts pleasure
This positivity parfait packs a bunch of happy ingredients: protein from a creamy cupful of Greek yogurt increases levels of pleasure-boosting neurotransmitters, and the yogurt’s probiotics may be a tasty way to fight depression[4]. Honey really is a spoonful of sweetness, with compounds that may fight depression by reducing inflammation in the brain. (Throw on some berries for extra healthy points!)

Salads

5. Salmon salad with vinaigrette
Fights depression
When a bad mood hits, try a forkful of fish to feel better. Keep things cheery and green with this salmon salad, chock-full of omega-3-filled ingredients (like salmon and olive oil) that can help prevent symptoms of depression[5][6]. Swap plain ol’ lettuce for spinach leaves for a bunch of mood-boosting B vitamins.

6. Warm quinoa, spinach, and shitake salad
Fights depression and anxiety
Quinoa’s not only an awesome vegan protein source — it’s also a complex carbohydrate that can help prevent depression and anxiety by increasing levels of serotonin in the brain. And beyond the B vitamins in spinach, mushrooms are a source of selenium, a compound that may help fight depression[7]. This superfood-packed salad‘s got all the goods!

7. Beet, citrus, and avocado salad
Boosts energy
This colorful concoction brightens up the mood and the dining table. A bowlful of beets helps increase happiness with tons of folate; the vitamin C in citrus fruit recharges the body; and the flavonoids in a squirt of lemon juice benefit the brain. Tell a bad day to beet it!

8. Wild seaweed salad
Fights depression and anxiety
Vegetarians and carnivores alike can enjoy the positive feelings that come from a bowl of this snazzy salad. Seaweed’s a source of iodine, which can help fight depression; brown rice is a complex carb that helps stabilize mood with serotonin; and the omega-3s in EVOO, flavonoids in lemon, and anthocyanins in honey may all boost mood[8].

Main Dishes

9. Poached eggs and asparagus
Fights depression and anxiety
Eggs are a (perhaps surprisingly) good source of vitamin D, which may be important for fighting depression; they also provide mood-boosting vitamin B. And asparagus is filled with tryptophan, which increases levels of serotonin in the brain and helps prevent depression and anxiety[9].

10. Brown rice and black beans
Fights depression and anxiety
Beans aren’t just good for the heart — they’re good for the mind, too, since the selenium in them can help reduce inflammation in the brain[10]. Plus brown rice can boost mood by regulating serotonin levels. Try this great recipe for happiness.

11. Almond-crusted barramundi fish
Fights depression
The name of this meal is fun to say, but that’s not all that’s great about it. Barramundi fish and almonds are excellent sources of omega-3s, which can help reduce depression and anxiety. Serve it with a side of spinach for a dose of B vitamins that also help create a positive mood. (Can’t find barramundi fish in the local grocery store? Try sea bass instead, although it doesn’t have quite as many omega-3s.)

12. Seared lamb chops with anchovies
Fights depression and beats stress
Go classier — and happier — than chicken wings and use grass-fed meat in this dinner recipe. Lamb is packed with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a compound that reduces stress hormones, and anchovies provide depression-fighting omega-3s.

13. Turkey burger with sweet potato fries
Fights depression and anxiety
Step up the traditional burger ’n fries with a meal that’s easier on the belly and the brain. The tryptophan in turkey increases levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that regulates mood. Plus sweet potatoes are filled with mood-boosting B vitamins. Fry them in olive oil for some extra omega-3 happiness power!

Pasta

14. Spaghetti with steamed mussels
Fights depression and anxiety
Mussels — and most types of shellfish — are loaded with B vitamins, important for a good mood[11] Try this recipe, which features whole-wheat pasta and EVOO. Certain food combinations have a lot to do with mood: A meal that includes carbs, protein, and fat (like this one) can stop a case of the Debby Downers in its tracks.

15. Whole-wheat pasta with cauliflower and collards
Fights depression
This vegetarian pasta dish has complex carbs, which help regulate mood, plus a serving of healthy veggies. Pack an extra punch with purple cauliflower — it not only looks cool, it also prevents depression with a hefty dose of B vitamins.

16. Walnut-miso noodles
Fights depression, anxiety, and stress
Everything about this dish screams healthy, happy, and delicious. Whole-wheat pasta is a complex carb that increases serotonin levels, and walnuts pack omega-3s that fight depression and anxiety. And chop up some chard for a tasty topping that’s a great source of magnesium, which can improve snooze time and reduce stress levels, especially for ladies[12][13].


Soups and Stews

17. Chicken soup with vegetables
Boosts alertness
Try a bowlful of the good stuff for the soul and for a smile. Chicken packs the protein that helps us stay alert and ready to tackle the day. And orange you glad vegetables like carrots and squash also improve mood. Loud slurping required.

18. Lentil and vegetable stew with kale
Fights depression
Curl up with a cup of lentil stew on a rainy day to keep things sunny inside. Kale and the little legumes are great sources of folate, important for a good mood[14].

Side Dishes

19. Braised collards with tomatoes
Fights depression
This picture-perfect side dish features B vitamins and lycopene, which may fight depression by reducing inflammation in the brain[15]. Substitute cherry tomatoes for the whole tomatoes in this recipe, since it’s easier to eat more of the lycopene-packed skin that way.

20. Fresh corn and blue potato hash
Fights depression
Don’t worry, these potatoes aren’t moldy, but they are delicious ways to get happy. Blue potatoes (and their skins) are loaded with anthocyanins and iodine, nutrients that reduce inflammation in the brain and help regulate mood. This creative recipe adds an extra bonus with the mood-boosting B vitamins in spinach.

Snacks and Desserts

21. Trail mix with nuts and dark chocolate
Boosts alertness and beats stress
This crunchy combo is filled with monounsaturated fats that help prevent blood sugar crashes, a major cause of grouchiness. Plus they can increase levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter that regulates mood (and digestion)[16]. And a smidge of dark chocolate can prevent sluggishness with high levels of theobromine, a stimulant similar to caffeine. Plus even a few bites of the sweet stuff can reduce levels of sneaky stress hormones.

22. Granola bars with chocolate
Fights depression and anxiety
These homemade treats may look like cookies, but they’re actually nutritious ways to perk up. They’re filled with ingredients that fight depression and anxiety, like the omega-3s in flaxseed and anthocyanins in honey[17]. Even better, dark chocolate’s a stress-buster and oats are a source of soluble fiber that helps prevent mood swings.

23. Chocolate chia seed pudding
Fights depression and anxiety
Ch-ch-ch-chia! And chocolate! A more nutritious alternative to the standard pudding cup, this recipe’s a double whammy for a good mood. Chia seeds are a source of those depression-and-anxiety-reducing Omega-3s, and dark cocoa powder helps keep bad moods in check.

Beverages

24. Coffee with cinnamon
Boosts energy
There’s no Red Bull required to make it through a long afternoon. Coffee’s a natural stimulant, brightening a dismal day by boosting energy and metabolism.. A cup o’ Joe may also create feel-good feelings (in humans and in rats) by increasing levels of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin[18]. And a sprinkle of cinnamon’s all it takes to put some more pep in that step.

25. Green tea and honey
Relieves anger and anxiety
Sip a cup of the green stuff at breakfast, before bedtime, or during a relaxing afternoon break. Green tea’s a great source of theanine, which helps reduce anger and improve concentration. Add a spoonful of honey to reap the benefits of anxiety-reducing anthocyanins[19].

Further Resources

BBC News — Salt is ‘natural mood-booster’

Salty tears may be sad, but a pinch on food may cheer us up.

Psychological Science — Comfort Food Fights Loneliness

Sometimes curling up with a bowl of chicken soup or mac ’n cheese really does make everything seem okay.

BOOK – The Happiness Diet

This diet is for the mind, not the waistline; one author investigates the relationship between food and mood.

Taste of Home – Smiley Face Pancakes Recipe

These breakfast treats are really designed for kids… but who’s watching?

Works Cited


  1. Association between folate, vitamin B(6) and vitamin B(12) intake and depression in the SUN cohort study. Sanchez-Villegas, A., Doreste, J., Schlatter, J., et al. School of Health Sciences, Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas, Spain. Journal of Human Nutrition and Diet 2009;22(2):122-33. [↩]
  2. Berry anthocyanins and their aglycons inhibit monoamine oxidases A and B. Dreiseitel, A., Korte, G., Schreier, P., et al. Department of Psyhciatry, Univeristy of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany. Pharmacology Research 2009;59(5):6-11. [↩]
  3. Omega-3 supplementation lowers inflammation and anxiety in medical students: a controlled randomized trial. Kiecolt-Glaser, J.K., Belury, M.A., Andridge, R., et al. Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Ohio State University College of Medicine, OH. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 2011;25(8):1725-34. [↩]
  4. Major depressive disorder: probiotics may be an adjuvant therapy. Logan, A.C., Katzman, M. Nutrition Research Consulting, Yonkers, NY. Medical hypotheses 2005;64(3):533-8. [↩]
  5. Fish-consumption and self-reported physical and mental health status. Silvers, K.M, Scott, K.M. New Zealand Institute for Crop & Food Research, New Zealand. Public Health Nutrition, 2002;5(3):427-31. [↩]
  6. Omega-3 supplementation lowers inflammation and anxiety in medical students: a controlled randomized trial. Kiecolt-Glaser, J.K., Belury, M.A., Andridge, R., et al. Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Ohio State University College of Medicine, OH. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 2011;25(8):1725-34. [↩]
  7. Selenium and clinical trials: new therapeutic evidence for multiple diseases. Sanmartin, C., Piano, D., Font, M., et al. Department of Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Navarra, Irunlarrea, Pamplona, Spain. Current Medicinal Chemistry 2011;18(30):4635-50. [↩]
  8. Bioactive compounds with effects on inflammation markers in humans. Rosa, F.T., Zulet, M.A., Marchini, J.S., et al. Division of Clinical Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paolo, Sao Paolo, Brazil. International Journal of Food Science and Nutrition 2012. Epub ahead of print. [↩]
  9. Tryptophan as an evolutionarily conserved signal to brain serotonin: molecular evidence and psychiatric implications. Russo, S., Kema, I.P., Bosker, F., et al. Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands, World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, 2009;10(4):258-68. [↩]
  10. The impact of selenium supplementation on mood. Benton, D., Cook, R. Department of Psychology. University College, Swansea, Wales, UK. Biological Psychiatry, 1991;29(11):1092-8. [↩]
  11. Characterization of vitamin B12 compounds from edible shellfish, clam, oyster, and mussel. Watanabe, F., Katsura, H., Takenaka, S., et al. Departmnet of Health Science, Kochi Women’s University, Kochi. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 2001;52(3):263-8. [↩]
  12. Magnesium, stress, and neuropsychiatric disorders. Galland, L. Great Smokies Diagnostic Laboratory, Asheville, N.C. Magnesium and Trace Elements, 1991-1992;10(2-4):287-301. [↩]
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