Our Better Health

Diet, Health, Fitness, Lifestyle & Wellness


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Fun Fact Friday

  • A pizza that has radius “z” and height “a”
    has volume Pi × z × z × a.
  • According to psychologists, exposure to nature allows us to remember and value important things like relationships, sharing, and community.
  • Girls who mature early in life are more likely to be delinquent and emotionally aggressive later in life.

 

Eating chocolate while studying will help the brain retain new information more easily, and has been directly linked to higher test scores.
Eating chocolate while studying will help the brain retain new information more easily,
and has been directly linked to higher test scores.
  • Shy people tend have great observational skills, making it easier to recognize the core of a problem then solving it.
  • Eating chocolate while studying will help the brain retain new information more easily, and has been directly linked to higher test scores.
  • Intelligent people have the ability to enhance the intelligence of those in their social circle
  • Smoking a cigarette causes damage in minutes – not years.
Happy Friday  🙂
 
source:       factualfacts.com       https://twitter.com/Fact       @Fact
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Childhood ADHD linked to secondhand smoking

BY SHEREEN LEHMAN

(Reuters) – Children exposed to tobacco smoke at home are up to three times more likely to have attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) as unexposed kids, according to a new study from Spain.

The association was stronger for kids with one or more hours of secondhand smoke exposure every day, the authors found. And the results held when researchers accounted for parents’ mental health and other factors.

“We showed a significant and substantial dose–response association between (secondhand smoke) exposure in the home and a higher frequency of global mental problems,” the authors write in Tobacco Control.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, two of every five children in the US are exposed to secondhand smoke regularly.

Alicia Padron of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Florida and colleagues in Spain analyzed data from the 2011 to 2012 Spanish National Health Interview Survey, in which parents of 2,357 children ages four to 12 reported the amount of time their children were exposed to secondhand smoke every day.

The parents also filled out questionnaires designed to evaluate their children’s mental health. According to the results, about eight percent of the kids had a probable mental disorder.

About seven percent of the kids were exposed to secondhand smoke for less than one hour per day, and 4.5 percent were exposed for an hour or more each day.

After taking the parent’s mental health, family structure and socioeconomic status into consideration, children who were exposed to secondhand smoke for less than one hour per day were 50 percent more likely to have some mental disorder compared to kids not exposed at all.

And children who were habitually exposed to secondhand smoke for an hour or more each day were close to three times more likely to have a mental disorder.

In addition, kids exposed less than one hour per day were twice as likely to have ADHD as kids who weren’t exposed, and children exposed for an hour or more on a daily basis were over three times more likely to have ADHD.

Smoking

“The association between secondhand smoke and global mental problems was mostly due to the impact of secondhand smoke on the attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder,” the authors write.

The study looks at a single point in time and cannot prove that secondhand smoke exposure causes mental health problems, the study team cautions.

Frank Bandiera, a researcher with the University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston who was not involved in the study, liked that the researchers “controlled for parents’ mental health in the new study because that could be a confounder.”

But, he added, the study might be limited because, although the questionnaires are thought to be valid, the mental disorders were not actually diagnosed by physicians.

“We’re not sure if it’s causal or not,” Bandiera told Reuters Health. “I think (the research) is still in the early stages and the findings are inconclusive.”

But, he said, since secondhand hand smoke has been related to a lot of physical diseases, parents should avoid smoking around their kids.

“We need to sort it out more, so we’re not sure yet, but just as a precaution, I don’t think parents should smoke at home – they should keep their kids away from secondhand smoke,” Bandiera said.

Lucy Popova, from the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco, said there is a lot of evidence about the harms of secondhand smoke on physical wellbeing.

“But research on effects of secondhand smoke on mental health have been really just emerging and this study really contributes to this growing body of evidence that exposure to secondhand smoke in children might be responsible for cognitive and behavioral problems,” she said.

Popova, who wasn’t involved in the study, said no amount of secondhand smoke is safe – any exposure is bad.

“So parents should not expose their children – the best thing to do is quit,” she said. “And this will not only not expose their children to the secondhand smoke, but will also let them enjoy their life with their children longer.”

SOURCE: bmj.co/1ajZCX4 Tobacco Control, online March 25, 2015           Reuters.com


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5 Simple Ways to Reduce Your Cancer Risk

Shubhra Krishan     September 27, 2013

Cancer is an ugly killer, but sometimes, small changes in diet and lifestyle can force it to beat a retreat. Adopt these five habits to reduce your cancer risk.

Exercise for 30 minutes a day. This will reduce your cancer risk by keeping your weight in check. According to the National Cancer Institute, obesity is associated with increased risks of cancers in the esophagus, breast (postmenopausal), endometrium (the lining of the uterus), colon and rectum, kidney, pancreas, thyroid, gallbladder, and possibly other cancer types.

Follow the ¾ plant, ¼ protein rule. Three-fourths of your plate should contain whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, while the rest can have animal proteins. According to Stanford’s Cancer Institute, research is discovering that the regular intake of fruits, vegetables, and cereal grains can inhibit the growth of cancer in the oral cavity, larynx, esophagus, stomach, colon, lung, prostate and rectum.


Steam, don‘t microwave. Vegetables with powerful antioxidants and flavonoids, such as broccoli, can lose some of their nutrients when microwaved. Steaming, on the other hand, helps retain their natural color and maintains their cancer-fighting superfood status.

Ditch the cigs. Did you know up to 30 percent of all cancers are related to smoking? The good news is that your cancer risk starts to plummet almost as soon as you reduce or give up smoking! If you need more convincing, simply read up the American Cancer Society’s tobacco-related cancer fact sheet.

Limit your drinking to just one 5-ounce glass of wine, or one beer a day. For men, the recommended limit is up to two glasses a day. Those who drink more are at a higher risk for cancers of the head and neck, breast, throat, mouth and colon. That’s because alcohol contains carcinogenic compounds that are introduced during fermentation and production.

source: care2.com


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Healthy Lifestyle May Offset Job Stress

Risk for heart disease rises when workers drink, smoke or overeat

WebMD News from HealthDay   By Robert Preidt   HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) – Job stress increases the risk of heart disease, but living a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce that risk, a new study says.

Researchers examined data from more than 102,000 men and women, aged 17 to 70, in the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Sweden and Finland. Their lifestyles were rated in one of three categories – healthy, moderately unhealthy or unhealthy – based on smoking, alcohol consumption, exercise/inactivity and obesity.

Those with a healthy lifestyle had no lifestyle risk factors, while people with a moderately unhealthy lifestyle had one risk factor. Two or more risk factors qualified as an unhealthy lifestyle.

Nearly 16 percent of the participants reported job stress, according to the study, which was published May 13 in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.


Over 10 years, the rate of coronary artery disease was 18.4 per 1,000 for people with job stress and 14.7 per 1,000 for those without job stress. The rate of heart disease for people with an unhealthy lifestyle was almost 31 per 1,000 compared to 12 per 1,000 for those with a healthy lifestyle.

When lifestyle and work were factored together, the heart disease rate was 31.2 per 1,000 for people with job stress and an unhealthy lifestyle and about 15 per 1,000 for those with job stress and a healthy lifestyle.

“The risk of coronary artery disease was highest among participants who reported job strain and an unhealthy lifestyle; those with job strain and a healthy lifestyle had about half the rate of this disease,” Dr. Mika Kivimaki, of the department of epidemiology and public health at University College London, and colleagues wrote in a journal news release.

“These observational data suggest that a healthy lifestyle could substantially reduce the risk of coronary artery disease risk among people with job strain,” they added.

Stress counseling isn’t enough, they said. “Clinicians might consider paying closer attention to lifestyle risk factors in patients who report job strain,” the researchers concluded.

source: WebMD   HealthDay


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Smoke-free laws linked to drop in child asthma attacks

LONDON    Mon Jan 21, 2013 

(Reuters) – Introducing laws banning smoking in enclosed public places can lead to swift and dramatic falls in the number of children admitted to hospital suffering asthma attacks, according to a study in England published on Monday.

Researchers at Imperial College London found there was a 12.3 percent fall in hospital admissions for childhood asthma in the first year after laws against smoking in enclosed public places and workplaces came into effect in July 2007.

Similar anti-smoking legislation has been introduced in many other countries, including in the United States where it has also been linked to a reduction in childhood asthma emergencies.

“The findings are good news … and they should encourage countries where public smoking is permitted to consider introducing similar legislation,” said Christopher Millett from Imperial’s school of public health, who led the study.

Asthma affects more than 300 million people worldwide and is the world’s most common children’s chronic illness. Symptoms include wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing and chest tightness. In Britain, it affects one in every 11 children.


Before the ban on smoking in enclosed public spaces was implemented in England, hospital admissions for children suffering a severe asthma attacks were increasing by 2.2 percent a year, peaking at 26,969 in 2006/2007, the researchers found.

That trend reversed immediately after the law came into effect, with lower admission rates among boys and girls of all ages. There were similar reductions among children in wealthy and poor neighborhoods, both in cities and in rural areas.

The effect was equivalent to 6,802 fewer hospital admissions in the first three years after the law came into effect, the team wrote in a study in the journal Pediatrics.

“There is already evidence that eliminating smoking from public places has resulted in substantial population health benefits … and this study shows that those benefits extend to … childhood asthma,” Millett said in a statement.

A study published in 2009 also found the ban on smoking in public places in England led to a swift and significant drop in the number of heart attacks, saving the national health service 8.4 million pounds ($13.3 million) in the first year.

“Previous studies have also suggested that the smoke-free law changed people’s attitudes about exposing others to second-hand smoke and led more people to abstain from smoking voluntarily at home and in cars,” Millett said.

(Reporting by Kate Kelland; Editing by Louise Ireland)

Source: Reuters


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Stricter smoking bans tied to more health benefits

Hospitalizations for heart, stroke and asthma ailments decreased after smoking bans introduced

CBC News Posted: Nov 2, 2012

Smoking bans in workplaces were associated with fewer deaths and hospitalizations due to heart attacks, strokes and respiratory diseases, a new review finds.

The introduction of smoke-free laws were followed by a 15 per cent decrease in hospitalizations for heart attacks, a 16 per cent decrease in stroke hospitalizations and a 24 per cent decrease in hospitalizations for diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

More comprehensive smoke-free laws that covered workplaces, restaurants and bars were associated with larger declines, the researchers said after reviewing 43 studies on smoke-free laws in U.S. cities and states as well as countries ranging from Uruguay to New Zealand.

“The study provides strong evidence not only of the health benefits of smokefree laws but also of the need to enact comprehensive laws without exceptions,” Stanton Glantz, the study’s senior author and director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco and his co-authors concluded in this week’s issue of the journal Circulation.

smoking

Passing smoke-free laws reflect changes in social norms that reduce smoking behaviour, they said.

Previous studies also found smoke-free laws were followed by decreases in hospital admissions for heart attacks and other heart problems.

The researchers cautioned that a cause-and-effect relationship can’t be drawn from studies comparing health effects before and after the introduction of smoking bans.

But one study in Helena, Mont. did observe a rebound in heart attack admissions after the city suspended its smoke-free law during a lawsuit, which supports a causal link, they said.

Glantz’s research was funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

Another study published this week in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine also found a 33 per cent decline in heart attacks when they compared the incidence 18 months before and after the introduction of smoke-free laws in workplaces, including bars, in one county in Minnesota.

Smoke-free laws are also associated with fewer hospital admissions for asthma in children and improved quality of life, the editors of a journal commentary accompanying the Minnesota study said.

“Moving forward, we should prioritize the enforcement of smoke-free policies, eliminating loopholes in existing policies as well as encouraging expansion of smoke-free policies to include multiunit housing, motor vehicles, casinos and outdoor locations,” wrote Dr. Sara Kalkhoran and Dr. Pamela Ling of the University of California, San Francisco.

source: CBC


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Stricter smoking bans tied to more health benefits

Hospitalizations for heart, stroke and asthma ailments decreased after smoking bans introduced

CBC News Posted: Nov 2, 2012

Smoking bans in workplaces were associated with fewer deaths and hospitalizations due to heart attacks, strokes and respiratory diseases, a new review finds.

The introduction of smoke-free laws were followed by a 15 per cent decrease in hospitalizations for heart attacks, a 16 per cent decrease in stroke hospitalizations and a 24 per cent decrease in hospitalizations for diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

More comprehensive smoke-free laws that covered workplaces, restaurants and bars were associated with larger declines, the researchers said after reviewing 43 studies on smoke-free laws in U.S. cities and states as well as countries ranging from Uruguay to New Zealand.

“The study provides strong evidence not only of the health benefits of smokefree laws but also of the need to enact comprehensive laws without exceptions,” Stanton Glantz, the study’s senior author and director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco and his co-authors concluded in this week’s issue of the journal Circulation.

Passing smoke-free laws reflect changes in social norms that reduce smoking behaviour, they said.

Previous studies also found smoke-free laws were followed by decreases in hospital admissions for heart attacks and other heart problems.

The researchers cautioned that a cause-and-effect relationship can’t be drawn from studies comparing health effects before and after the introduction of smoking bans.

But one study in Helena, Mont. did observe a rebound in heart attack admissions after the city suspended its smoke-free law during a lawsuit, which supports a causal link, they said.

Glantz’s research was funded by the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

Another study published this week in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine also found a 33 per cent decline in heart attacks when they compared the incidence 18 months before and after the introduction of smoke-free laws in workplaces, including bars, in one county in Minnesota.

Smoke-free laws are also associated with fewer hospital admissions for asthma in children and improved quality of life, the editors of a journal commentary accompanying the Minnesota study said.

“Moving forward, we should prioritize the enforcement of smoke-free policies, eliminating loopholes in existing policies as well as encouraging expansion of smoke-free policies to include multiunit housing, motor vehicles, casinos and outdoor locations,” wrote Dr. Sara Kalkhoran and Dr. Pamela Ling of the University of California, San Francisco.

source: CBC