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Dangers of A1 Beta Casein

Sunday, August 21, 2011        Dr. David Jockers

(NaturalNews) Dairy products are one of the most common foods consumed around the world. Some cultures survive on diets consisting of up to 80% raw cow, goat, &/or sheep milk. In the western world, however, dairy has become one of the most inflammatory foods. A recent discovery shows that a genetic shift in the casein molecule has produced a powerful toxin linked to numerous disorders and diseases.

Milk contains two primary protein molecules: whey and casein. Casein makes up about 80% of the protein in the milk. Casein is made up of 209 amino acids strung together in sequence. The 2 primary forms of casein are: A1 Beta Casein and A2 Beta Casein. These 2 are nearly identical in structure except for the amino acid at position 67. A1 contains histidine while A2 contains proline.

The bond between histidine and its linked amino acids is much weaker and much more easily broken than the bonding of proline in A2. This splitting happens during the digestive process and creates a peptide called beta casomorphin 7 (BCM7). BCM7 is an opioid, which gives it morphine-like qualities. This creates rampant oxidative stress in the gut and blood stream.

BCM7 is a 7 amino acid peptide that is resistant to degradation. It takes very strong immune responses to break this molecule down effectively. This immune response often takes place in the gut and causes digestive distress and leaky gut syndrome. The most susceptible individuals are those who already have digestive problems and infants who naturally have increased intestinal permeability.

When BCM7 passes into the bloodstream, it is able to cross through the blood brain barrier. In the brain, it can bind to opioid receptors and cause symptoms of schizophrenia, autism, and other mood and neurodevelopmental issues. Research performed on rats has shown autistic and schizophrenic type behavioral changes after the rats were injected with BCM7.

A1 beta casein and its byproduct BCM7 have also been linked to cases of type I diabetes, digestive disorders, neurodegenerative disorders and heart disease. These issues have the most supportive evidence linking them to A1 beta casein. This does not mean that A1 beta casein isn`t associated with other health disorders as well.

Avoiding A1 Beta Casein:

It can be quite challenging to enjoy dairy products and avoid A1 Beta Casein in the western hemisphere. You certainly have to look for specific breeds of cow that will not be labeled at the grocery store. A1 beta casein is produced by cattle belonging to the Bos Taurus subspecies, which is the primary breed of cattle in the western hemisphere. The Guernsey breeds produce only about 10% of their beta casein as A1 while the Jersey breed produces about 35%. The Ayrshire, Holstein, and Frisian breeds tend to produce 50% or more.

Goats do not produce A1 beta casein making their milk and dairy products. The `land of milk and honey` that was described in the bible is thought to be a reference to raw, goat milk and raw honey. Raw milk from grass-fed animals without A1 beta casein has a number of amazing health benefits due to the healthy omega 6:3 ratios, conjugated linoleic acid, and other immune supportive properties.

Organic butter from a grass-fed cow is still very healthy regardless of the breed of cow because it contains little to no protein. Research has found that cheese, yogurt, and fermented milk products from A1 beta casein containing breeds produce around the same amount of BCM7 as regular milk. These products should only be consumed from breeds of cow that produce very little A1 beta casein or none at all.

[Editor`s Note: NaturalNews is strongly against the use of all forms of animal testing. We fully support implementation of humane medical experimentation that promotes the health and wellbeing of all living creatures.]



sources:

http://naturalbias.com/a1-beta-casein-the-devil-in-your-milk/  

http://www.betacasein.org/

http://thebovine.wordpress.com/2008/11/15/a1-beta-casein-in-milk-also-implicated-in-autism-and-schizophrenia-percent-a1-and-a2-in-milk-is-breed-dependent/

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Meat and Dairy Can Rapidly Alter Gut Bacteria and Cause Inflammation

Michelle Schoffro Cook     December 19, 2013

The adage “you are what you eat” might never have been truer. According to new research, your health may be determined by what you eat, and what microorganisms came along for the ride.
A new Harvard University study published in the journal Nature found that diet rapidly alters the microorganisms residing in the gut. And if what you ate was either meat or dairy, you might not be happy with their findings.  It has long been known that diet influences the type and activity of the trillions of microorganisms residing in the human gut, but Harvard scientists found that even what we eat in the short-term can have drastic effects on the type and numbers of microbes in our gut and their capacity to increase inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract (GI).
Researchers found that within two days of consuming an animal-based diet, microbes in the alistipes, bilophila, and bacteroides families increased.  Harvard scientists also discovered that microbes found in the food itself, including bacteria, fungi, and viruses, quickly colonized the gut.  And, perhaps most notably, they discovered that an animal-based diet caused the growth of microorganisms that are capable of triggering inflammatory bowel disease within only two days of eating these foods.  Earlier research showed that bilophilia overgrowth promotes inflammation.  Still further research has linked inflammation-causing microbes to serious chronic diseases, meaning that the Harvard study has potentially far-reaching implications for disease prevention and treatment.
The scientists put volunteers on a meat and cheese diet, then switched them to a fiber-rich, plant-based diet to track the effect on intestinal microbes.  They ate a breakfast of eggs and bacon, a lunch of ribs and briskets, and salami, prosciutto and assorted cheeses for dinner, along with pork rind snacks.  After a break from eating this diet the volunteers ate a plant-based diet of granola for breakfast, jasmine rice, cooked onions, tomatoes, squash, garlic, peas, and lentils for lunch and a similar dinner, with bananas and mangoes for snacks.
 
The scientists analyzed the volunteers’ microbes before, during, and after each meal.  The effects of the meat and cheese were immediate.  The abundance of bacteria shifted about a day after the food hit the gut. After three days on either diet, the bacteria in the gut changed their behavior.
Lead scientist Lawrence David, PhD admits that the meat and cheese diet was extreme; however, it seems to have painted a clear picture of the outcome of a diet heavy in meat and cheese—a typical diet for many people who use high protein diets to lose weight.  Dr. David said in an interview with NPR “I love meat … but I will say that I definitely feel a lot more guilty ordering a hamburger … since doing this work.”  He also indicates that the study unlocks a potentially new avenue for treating intestinal disease.  I would add that it likely unlocks ways to treat other inflammatory diseases in the body. Heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, and even cancer have been linked to inflammation in the body.
You may want to rethink that bacon-wrapped sausage hors d’oeuvre or cheese platter during the holidays … or anytime.
source: Care2.com


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5 Dairy-Free Ways to Get Probiotics

Whether you’ve gone vegan or just aren’t a fan of yogurt, you may be wondering how to get probiotics into your diet without eating dairy products. Behold! Five nondairy fermented foods that will foster healthy bacteria in your gut. 

By Jaclyn Desforges

For many people, yogurt and probiotics are one and the same. But eating dairy products isn’t the only way to keep your system healthy. According to Donna Schwenk, author of Cultured Food Life: Learn to Make Probiotic Foods in Your Home, you can look beyond the dairy aisle toward fermented foods such as sauerkraut and kombucha (a type of fermented tea), which are filled with health-promoting probiotics.

So why are probiotics so good for you? “Your immune system must learn to identify safe environmental factors from dangerous ones in order to act appropriately,” explains Schwenk. “It does this through the help of bacteria. Bacteria are not only ‘good’ in most cases but also critical to training our immune systems to help prevent chronic illnesses, including allergies.” The result? Better digestion and a healthier immune system.

1. Sprouted breads

When you think of probiotic foods, bread probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind. But bread made from sprouted grains packs a powerful probiotic punch.

“All the phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors are deactivated in these breads, so vitamins and minerals skyrocket,” says Schwenk. “You receive nutrients that you can’t get from other breads.” Having trouble finding sprouted varieties in the bread aisle? Some brands, such as Silver Hills and Ezekiel 4:9, are found in the freezer section.

2. Kefir

Kefir is a tart fermented drink made from gelatinous grains. Though normally made in a cow’s- or goat’s-milk base, it can be made dairy-free using coconut or almond milk. According to Schwenk, kefir has anywhere from 36 to 56 strains of probiotics, compared to only seven in yogurt. Make your own dairy-free kefir by adding coconut or almond milk to kefir powder starter packages (found in health-food stores.)

3. Kombucha

Kombucha is a fermented tea that’s loaded with B vitamins and probiotics. While you can usually find it premade in stores, you can also make it at home with kombucha starter culture. “It’s a powerful liver detox and all-around adrenal supporter,” says Schwenk. And thanks to the natural CO2 carbonization that’s created during the fermentation process, kombucha is a bubbly probiotic-rich alternative to pop.

Photography, iStockphoto.com


4. Tempeh

Usually found in the freezer or refrigerated section of the grocery store, tempeh is made from whole fermented soybeans and is a rich source of probiotics. Unlike most probiotic foods, tempeh’s gut-friendly bacteria has the ability to withstand high temperatures – a big plus for this stir-fry favourite. 


5. Cultured veggies

Eating cultured vegetables such as sauerkraut, Korean kimchee and pickles is another dairy-free way to boost your probiotic intake. “These veggies are my secret weapons for colds, flus and any kind of stomach trouble,” says Schwenk.

While she recommends canning your own cultured veggies for maximum probiotic benefit, store-bought varieties are also beneficial. For the biggest probiotic boost, make sure to pick up lacto-fermented varieties of pickles and sauerkraut, located in the refrigerator aisle of your grocery or health-food store. “Homemade is most effective, but picking up store-bought ones can be a great way to start consuming these foods,” she says.


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Why Calcium In Milk And Most Calcium Supplements Are A Huge Detriment To Your Health

by MARCO TORRES     August 21, 2013

Most people are unaware that pasteurized milk actually causes osteoporosis because there is a process the body must commit to due to milk’s calcium content being unabsorbed. The majority of calcium supplements on the market also contain inferior forms of the mineral which are also not absorbable and actually decrease the digestibility of other nutrients. 

The belief that calcium is what builds strong bones is absolutely ingrained in our society, but has no basis in reality-calcium is but ONE of the many minerals your body needs for building strong bones. Conventional calcium supplements have demonstrated little benefit, and they may increase your risk for a cardiovascular event. 

If you take too much Calcium (and to a slightly lesser degree, Magnesium) at once, it will cause your body pH to rise, which might try to change your blood pH, but your blood pH WILL NOT change because even a small change will kill you instantly! The body is quick to dump calcium & other minerals to check the rise in alkalinity, but where does the calcium go? 

A 2004 study showed that people with excess calcium in their coronary artery and who take statins have a 17-fold higher risk of heart attacks than do those with lower arterial calcium levels; researchers concluded that the two most definitive indicators of heart attack were LDL levels and calcium build-up.

A 2007 study showed that calcium from dietary sources has more favorable effects on bone health than calcium from supplements in postmenopausal women (Am J Clin Nutr 2007).

A 2008 study found calcium supplements are associated with a greater number of heart attacks in postmenopausal women (BMJ 2008) 

A 2010 meta-analysis showed calcium supplements (without coadministered vitamin D) are associated with increased risk for heart attack (BMJ 2010) 

A recent randomised controlled study, published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, analysed the effect of calcium on joint symptoms in postmenopausal women – finding that intake of a supplement had no significant effect on the severity of joint symptoms.

Dr. Eldon Dahl has explained the importance in the following PreventDisease.com interview of sourcing supplements with formulations that contain ingredients that complement each other. 

Most supplements on the supplement market today contain calcium carbonate which is an inferior form of calcium and manufacturers attach a simple chelating agent like citric acid to make it more absorbable, however the end product is inferior to other calcium supplements such as calcium orotate, which is the only known form of calcium which can effectively penetrate the membranes of cells. 

Calcium and all minerals actually, are inorganic. Consequently, they are not easily absorbed. It’s required they be bound to some other substance (preferably organic) in order to be utilized at all. The inorganic salt, carbonate, neutralizes a required stomach acid. Among many key physiological requirements and ratios, stomach acid is desperately needed for absorption of ALL minerals.

With the support of medical research, the market has been flooded with calcium supplements, many which fail to take into consideration calcium metabolism. You have all heard the old saying, “You are what you eat.” In light of today’s food supplies, it may be more apropos to say “You are what you absorb.” A mineral that is not absorbed cannot get into the bones; it just floats in the blood stream and then forms deposits in the joints. The amount absorbed is more important than the quantity consumed.

The type of minerals in the formula determines the absorption levels: Opti-Cal/Mag with Vitamin K2 is a co-enzyme complex, heat-stabled molecules that must be associated with another enzyme for them to perform their function in the body. It is necessary in the utilization of vitamins and minerals for proper delivery to the cell nucleus. One study found that Opti-Cal/Mag complex is 8.79 times more absorbed into the blood than calcium carbonate and 2.97 times more than calcium gluconate. 

Another interesting study found that calcium from bone meal/powder is absorbed 1.13 times more than calcium carbonate, the variety found in most supplements. Clinical reports consistently confirm that dietary/food calcium in its more absorbable form benefits in the management of lowering blood levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and blood pressure. Other health concerns from calcium deficiencies can contribute to muscle cramps, insomnia, mood/behavioral/nerve problems, hypertension, growth problems, kidney stones, and colon cancer. More recent research indicates that calcium also plays a role in preventing cancer by detoxifying potentially cancer-causing compounds in the bowel.


Dairy – One of The WORST Foods for Calcium Absorption 

Another fact most people are unaware of is the myth promoted by the dairy industry that consuming pasteurized dairy products such as milk or cheese increases calcium levels. This is totally false. The pasteurization process only creates calcium carbonate, which has absolutely no way of entering the cells without a chelating agent. So what the body does is pull the calcium from the bones and other tissues in order to buffer the calcium carbonate in the blood. This process ACTUALLY CAUSES OSTEOPOROSIS. Milk definitively does not do a body good if it’s pasteurized.

Dairy contains too little magnesium needed at the proper ratio to absorb the calcium. Most would agree that a minimum amount of Mag in the Cal. to Mag Ratio is 2 to 1 and preferably 1 to 1. So milk, at a Cal/Mag ratio of 10 to 1, has a problem. You may put 1200 mg of dairy calcium in your mouth, but you will be lucky to actually absorb a third of it into your system

Consider, why is it that the elderly bent over double with osteoporosis even after they ate plenty of dairy and took the doctor recommended calcium supplements most of their adult life? Could it be that pharmaceutical conglomerates know that dairy (and most doctor recommended calcium supplements) are not a good source of calcium, but they tell you they are because they don’t really want the “calcium” to stave off osteoporosis…they would much rather sell you Fosamax instead.

6 WAYS TO MAXIMIZE CALCIUM ABSORPTION

1. Eat calcium rich foods
Eat foods high in calcium. The best food sources are non-pasteurized raw dairy sources such as raw milk/yogurt, as well as bony fish, such as sardines. Leafy green veg such as kale, broccoli and spinach are also rich in calcium. Dried herbs and dried fruits such as figs and currants are also good choices. Seeds such as sesame, chia and flax are also rich sources of calcium. Also, enjoy foods that contain sulfur such as garlic and onions.

2. Food selections/combinations are critical
Try not to eat whole grains and calcium-rich foods at the same time. Whole grains contain a substance that binds with calcium and prevents proper absorption. Some foods that contain compounds such as oxalic or phytic acids, such as sweet potatoes, beans, rhubarb, celery and beets, can also decrease the amount of calcium that’s absorbed when eaten at the same time as calcium-rich foods.

3. Avoid the causes of mineral excretion
Pass on phosphate-containing foods such as soft drinks. Phosphorus causes the body to excrete calcium. Limit or avoid high-protein animal foods. A diet high in protein causes calcium to be excreted from your body. Decrease caffeine consumption. People who smoke have significantly lower bone density, while drinking alcohol can also prevent your bones from absorbing the maximum nutrients from your food.

4. Get more Sunlight and Vitamin D
Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium. Although some is found in oily fish, our main source comes from the effect of sunlight on your skin. It’s estimated that half of us have a deficiency because we don’t get outside enough or because we always use sunblock. It is especially important to maximize sun exposure between May and September to keep vitamin D levels topped up. Just 10 minutes of sunlight a day on bare arms and your face can cut your risk of bone fractures by a third. A half hour exposing your torso is equivalent to roughly 10,000 units of Vitamin D.

5. The right exercise
Another vital way to boost your bones is weight-bearing exercise –basically anything that has you upright and using your body weight. Good choices include squatting, rope skipping, aerobics, plyometrics, dancing or brisk walking. “Research shows that if you don’t exercise you end up weeing out all the calcium you take in instead of storing it in your bones,” warns Professor Dawn Skelton, an aging and health specialist at Glasgow Caledonian University. “Ideally we should aim for 150 minutes of moderate activity per week. “Put simply, the more hours we spend on our feet, the fewer bone breakages we should have in later life.”

6. Avoid Medications and Medical Therapies
Acid-blocking medications used for heartburn and other gastrointestinal conditions can block the absorption of calcium through the stomach walls. Stomach acids break down food during the digestive process, allowing the nutrients to become absorbed into your body. Medications designed to stop acid production or decrease the amount of acids present in your stomach can have a negative effect on calcium. 

Sources:
drbenkim.com  
life-choice.net  
health.gov  

Marco Torres is a research specialist, writer and consumer advocate for healthy lifestyles. He holds degrees in Public Health and Environmental Science and is a professional speaker on topics such as disease prevention, environmental toxins and health policy.


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Harvard Scientists Urge You to Stop Drinking Milk

Posted by: True Activist  July 3, 2013   
by: Mike Barrett     Natural Society

Vegans may have had it right all along; while raw, organic milk offers numerous health benefits, a Harvard researcher and pediatrician argues that conventional milk and dairy products alike are a detriment to your health – thanks to added health-compromising sweeteners.

As David Ludwig mentioned in his research, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics, there have been countless pieces of research concluding the ill effects of sugar-sweetened beverages. The over-consumption of sugar has been tied to obesity, diabetes, inflammatory-related pain, and much more. And because of sugar’s negative effects on our health, even the United States Department of Agriculture, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and other organizations are recommending against consuming calories from sugary drinks.

The one calorie-containing beverage they still heavily promote, however, is reduced-fat milk, where the organization recommends drinking 3 cups daily. This is where Ludwig questions the scientific rationale for such recommendations.

“This recommendation to drink three cups a day of milk – it’s perhaps the most prevailing advice given to the American public about diet in the last half century. As a result, Americans are consuming billions of gallons of milk a year, presumably under the assumption that their bones would crumble without them,” says David Ludwig.

As far as Ludwig is concerned, if the USDA is recommending to drink reduced-fat milk, it is also inadvertently encouraging the consumption of added sugars – a piece of advice that goes against all the research saying not to consume sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages. The idea of consuming low-fat milk or chocolate milk cancels out the whole reasoning for the recommendation in the first place since the fats are simply being replaced with dangerous sugars.

“The worst possible situation is reduced-fat chocolate milk: you take out the fat, it’s less tasty. So to get kids to drink 3 cups a day, you get this sugar-sweetened beverage,” Ludwig says. ”…we can get plenty of calcium from a whole range of foods. On a gram for gram basis, cooked kale has more calcium than milk. Sardines, nuts seeds beans, green leafy vegetables are all sources of calcium.”



The Case Against Low-Fat Dairy, and Other Dangers of Milk

Harvard researcher David Ludwig certainly has a point in analyzing and ultimately criticizing the USDA’s recommendations, but there is much more to the full-fat vs reduced-fat argument for milk and dairy products.

There are plenty of reasons to avoid certain fats such as trans-fats and refined polyunsaturated fats in vegetable oils (like corn, soy, sunflower, and canola), but the evidence for moderate consumption of saturated fat, which is found in milk, coconut oil, and grass-fed land animals, is coming to the surface. While saturated fat was villainized for decades, a 2010 analysis published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that “there is no significant evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of [coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease].”

Further, there are numerous benefits to drinking full-fat dairy products. In it’s most pure state (raw, organic, and coming from grass-fed cows), full-fat dairy has been found in research to potentially promote heart health, control diabetes, aid in vitamin absorption, lower bowel cancer risk, and even aid in weight loss. But while pure dairy could promote your health, conventional dairy may prove damaging.

Before you consume more conventional dairy, please educate yourself as to what’s in your dairy. You’d be surprised that there could be 20+ painkillers, antibiotics, and much more lurking in your milk.

sources:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2353336/Got-milk-Better-make-sure-s-low-fat-sugar-free.html
http://www.today.com/health/milk-does-body-good-maybe-not-always-harvard-doc-argues-6C10505414


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The Dangers Of Dairy

BY DR. AMY MYERS      APRIL 10, 2013 
All those “Got Milk?” ads from the last decade or so would have us believe that dairy is a cornerstone of a healthy diet, providing essential nutrients, fortifying our bones, and knocking out osteoporosis left and right. But… is this true? Is consuming dairy necessary or even healthy for most people?

The truth is, dairy can lead to countless health issues and, for many, can cause more harm than good, here’s why. 
It’s highly inflammatory. 
Dairy is one of the most inflammatory foods in our modern diet, second only to gluten. It causes inflammation in a large percentage of the population, resulting in digestive issues such as bloating, gas, constipation, and diarrhea, as well as other symptoms including acne, and a stronger presentation of autistic behaviors. 
What is it about dairy that causes an inflammatory response? Is everyone with a dairy sensitivity lactose intolerant? There are two components of dairy that tend to cause issues for people: (1) the sugar and (2) the proteins. 
People who are lactose intolerant don’t produce the lactase enzyme, which is required to break down lactose, a sugar found in milk, causing digestive issues whenever they consume dairy products. People who do produce the lactase enzyme but still react poorly to milk are responding to the two proteins found in milk, casein and whey. Casein is a protein with a very similar molecular structure to gluten and 50% of people who are gluten intolerant are casein intolerant as well.
It’s acid-forming. 
Our bodies like to maintain a neutral pH balance: not too much acidity, not too much alkalinity. Milk, like most animal products, is an acid forming food, meaning whenever you consume dairy, your body must compensate for the increased acidity in order to restore a neutral pH balance.
It does this by pulling from the alkaline “reserves” it keeps on hand in the form of calcium, magnesium, and potassium, that are stored in your bones. Pulling from these reserves weakens your bones, leaving them more susceptible to fractures and breaks, meaning milk might not be such a great preventative tool against osteoporosis as we’re told. In fact, research has shown that countries with the highest rate of dairy consumption also have the highest rate of osteoporosis.


It’s often full of hormones and antibiotics
Many times when people drink milk they’re consuming far more than just milk. American dairy farmers have long been injecting cows with a genetically engineered bovine growth hormone called rBGH to increase milk production. This forced increase in milk production often leads to an udder infection in cows called mastitis, which is then treated with courses of antibiotics, which can make their way into your dairy products.
All of these concerns about the health benefits and safety of dairy can lead to even more questions. Is all dairy bad, are alternative sources of dairy any better? Where will I get my calcium if not from dairy? Let’s take a look at these: 
What about goat’s milk and sheep’s milk?
Some people who choose to eliminate cow’s milk from their diet still enjoy goat’s or sheep’s milk, as they find it much easier to tolerate. Although these have a similar lactose content to cow’s milk (meaning if you are lactose intolerant, they will not be any easier to digest) they do have a different type of casein protein, which makes them easier for casein-sensitive people to handle.
Casein exists in two variants, A1 beta-casein and A2 beta-casein, which are differentiated only by a single amino acid in their protein chains. A2 is considered the original beta-casein because A1 only appeared a few thousand years ago after a mutation occurred in European cow herds, and people react poorly to the A1 beta-casein. Goat’s milk and sheep’s milk lack the A1 beta-casein, which is what makes them more tolerable, but because the A1 and A2 proteins are so similar, these milks can still cause problems for some.
What about organic or raw milk?
If you aren’t casein sensitive, and still want to consume cow’s milk, a healthier and less-chemical laden route to go can be organic or raw milk. These kinds of milk typically come from cows that have not been injected with rGBH and have not been treated with antibiotics, which eliminates the concern that these chemicals will find their way into your milk.
Raw milk, although contentiously debated, does have many health benefits that pasteurized milk lacks. The pasteurizing process, which is intended to kill harmful bacteria, kills many of the helpful enzymes that occur naturally in milk as well. In fact, one of the enzymes present in raw milk that is missing in pasteurized milk is the lactase enzyme, meaning people who are lactose intolerant are actually able to drink raw milk because it contains the enzyme needed to break down lactose their body is unable to produce.
What should you do if you think you’re sensitive to dairy? 
Ultimately the decision of whether or not to consume dairy rests with you. Try eliminating 100% of dairy from your diet for 30 days and pay attention to how your body reacts. Then try reintroducing dairy in its different forms and sources and notice how you respond.
If you do decide to eliminate dairy, fear not, there are plenty of other natural sources of calcium you can incorporate into your diet!
10 Non-Dairy Sources of Calcium
  1. Almonds
  2. Kale
  3. Oranges
  4. Collard Greens
  5. Broccoli
  6. Figs
  7. Spinach
  8. Enriched rice, almond, hemp and coconut milks
  9. Sesame seeds
  10. Tofu


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Prostate cancer linked to high intake of protein and calcium from dairy

Monday, April 29, 2013   by: PF Louis

(NaturalNews) The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPICN) is a multicenter meta-epidemiological (broad statistical survey) study designed to assess cancer risks by investigating past and current relationships between diet, lifestyle, environmental factors and cancer among a large population of different EU nations. 

EPICN had a pool of 500,000 men and women recruited from 28 centers in 10 European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom (UK) for several studies involving different cancers and groups with different lifestyles and diets.

A UK sub-study isolated 142,251 men from this vast pool, excluding Norway and France. Both of those nations had only women in the study. The men were recruited between 1989 and 2004 with a median age of 52, mostly white Europeans from the eight nations that had men in the EPICN cohort (group of similar types).

During recruitment, this male group taken from the EPICN required consentual access to medical records, no history or diagnosis of cancer proven by medical records, and were able to complete questionnaires on their diet, lifestyle and medical history. 

Men in the top one percent and bottom one percent of the institutionally recommended caloric intake were excluded from this study in order to remove wide variances from their statistical analysis. 

The UK study

The UK study, “Animal foods, protein, calcium and prostate cancer risk: the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition” study was completed in March 2007 and its paper was published in the British Journal of Cancer in April 2008.

Animal foods for those in the study included total meat and meat products with their subcategories, fish and shellfish with their subcategories, and dairy products, including milk, yoghurt, cheese, and eggs. Food amounts were measured in grams.

dairy

It had already been hypothesized that a high intake of animal protein enhanced growth hormone activity to increase the risk of prostate cancer. Some non-clinical studies showed a strong correlation with milk to higher incidents of prostate cancer with the hypothesis that high calcium intake from dairy products inhibits the synthesis of vitamin D.

After an average of 8.7 years of follow-up, 2,727 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer among the 142,520 participants. The UK did not find a direct association with milk alone to prostate cancer, as other studies seemed to have suggested.

But they determined that protein from milk products, cheese, yoghurt, and others was a strong factor among those whose daily consumption exceeded the recommended daily amount by 35 grams (1.2 ounces) daily.

Calcium from dairy products was associated with prostate cancer risk as well, but not calcium from other foods. In the researchers’ opinion, their results support the hypothesis that a high intake of protein or calcium from dairy products may increase the risk for prostate cancer.

Opinion Despite statistical machinations to offset extraneous factors and with just under a 2 percent prostate cancer outcome among 142,500 men over several years of monitoring, one wonders how this can be so conclusive.

 One may question if dairy products, especially dairy products from raw milk, increase the risk of prostate cancer. Raw milk dairy product intake was not considered in this study.

One thing is for certain, this study kept several researchers busily employed for a few years.

Sources for this study includes:

source: NaturalNews