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Gut Bacteria Shift Quickly After Changes in Diet, Study Shows

December 11, 2013    By Brenda Goodman   HealthDay Reporter

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 11, 2013 (HealthDay News) — If you were to switch from vegetarianism to meat-eating, or vice-versa, chances are the composition of your gut bacteria would also undergo a big change, a new study suggests.

The research, published Dec. 11 in the journal Nature, showed that the number and kinds of bacteria — and even the way the bacteria behaved — changed within a day of switching from a normal diet to eating either animal- or plant-based foods exclusively.

“Not only were there changes in the abundance of different bacteria, but there were changes in the kinds of genes that they were expressing and their activity,” said study author Lawrence David, an assistant professor at the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy at Duke University.

Trillions of bacteria live in each person’s gut. They’re thought to play a role in digestion, immunity and possibly even body weight.

The study suggests that this bacterial community and its genes — called the microbiome — are extraordinarily flexible and capable of responding swiftly to whatever is coming its way.

“The gut microbiome is potentially quite sensitive to what we eat,” David said. “And it is sensitive on time scales shorter than had previously been thought.”

David said, however, that it’s hard to tease out exactly what that might mean for human health.

Another expert agreed.

“It’s nice to have some solid evidence now that these types of significant changes in diet can impact the gut microflora in a significant way,” said Jeffrey Cirillo, a professor of microbial and molecular pathogenesis at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine in Bryan, Texas. “That’s very nice to see, and it’s very rapid. It’s surprising how quick the changes can occur.”

Cirillo said it was also intriguing how fast the microbiome seemed to recover. The study found that gut bacteria were back to business as usual about a day after people stopped eating the experimental diet.


For the study, researchers recruited six men and four women between the ages of 21 and 33. For the first four days of the study, they ate their usual diets. For the next five days, they switched to eating either all plant-based or all animal-based foods. They then went back to their normal eating habits before switching to the other diet pattern.

The animal-based diet resulted in the biggest changes to gut bacteria. It spurred the growth of 22 species of bacteria, while only three bacterial species became more prominent in the plant-based diet.

The researchers don’t fully understand what the shifts mean, but, they said, some made sense. For example, several types of bacteria that became more prevalent with the animal-based diet are good at resisting bile acids. The liver makes bile to help break down fat.

Another type of bacteria, which became more common in the plant-based diet, is thought to be sensitive to fiber intake.

The researchers speculated that the bacterial shifts might explain why fatty diets have been linked to diseases like Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. More studies are needed, however, before they can say for sure.

source: news.health.com

 

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Health benefits of taking probiotics

Bacteria have a reputation for causing disease, so the idea of tossing down a few billion a day for your health might seem — literally and figuratively — hard to swallow. But a growing body of scientific evidence suggests that you can treat and even prevent some illnesses with foods and supplements containing certain kinds of live bacteria. Northern Europeans consume a lot of these beneficial microorganisms, called probiotics (from pro and biota, meaning “for life”), because of their tradition of eating foods fermented with bacteria, such as yogurt. Probiotic-laced beverages are also big business in Japan.

Enthusiasm for such foods has lagged in the United States, but interest in probiotic supplements is on the rise. Some digestive disease specialists are recommending them for disorders that frustrate conventional medicine, such as irritable bowel syndrome. Since the mid-1990s, clinical studies have established that probiotic therapy can help treat several gastrointestinal ills, delay the development of allergies in children, and treat and prevent vaginal and urinary infections in women.

Self-dosing with bacteria isn’t as outlandish as it might seem. An estimated 100 trillion microorganisms representing more than 500 different species inhabit every normal, healthy bowel. These microorganisms (or microflora) generally don’t make us sick; most are helpful. Gut-dwelling bacteria keep pathogens (harmful microorganisms) in check, aid digestion and nutrient absorption, and contribute to immune function.

The best case for probiotic therapy has been in the treatment of diarrhea. Controlled trials have shown that Lactobacillus GG can shorten the course of infectious diarrhea in infants and children (but not adults). Although studies are limited and data are inconsistent, two large reviews, taken together, suggest that probiotics reduce antibiotic-associated diarrhea by 60%, when compared with a placebo.

Probiotic therapy may also help people with Crohn’s disease and irritable bowel syndrome. Clinical trial results are mixed, but several small studies suggest that certain probiotics may help maintain remission of ulcerative colitis and prevent relapse of Crohn’s disease and the recurrence of pouchitis (a complication of surgery to treat ulcerative colitis). Because these disorders are so frustrating to treat, many people are giving probiotics a try before all the evidence is in for the particular strains they’re using. More research is needed to find out which strains work best for what conditions.


Probiotics may also be of use in maintaining urogenital health. Like the intestinal tract, the vagina is a finely balanced ecosystem. The dominant Lactobacilli strains normally make it too acidic for harmful microorganisms to survive. But the system can be thrown out of balance by a number of factors, including antibiotics, spermicides, and birth control pills. Probiotic treatment that restores the balance of microflora may be helpful for such common female urogenital problems as bacterial vaginosis, yeast infection, and urinary tract infection.

Many women eat yogurt or insert it into the vagina to treat recurring yeast infections, a “folk” remedy for which medical science offers limited support. Oral and vaginal administration of Lactobacilli may help in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis, although there isn’t enough evidence yet to recommend it over conventional approaches. (Vaginosis must be treated because it creates a risk for pregnancy-related complications and pelvic inflammatory disease.) Probiotic treatment of urinary tract infections is under study.

Probiotics are generally considered safe — they’re already present in a normal digestive system — although there’s a theoretical risk for people with impaired immune function. Be sure the ingredients are clearly marked on the label and familiar to you or your health provider. There’s no way to judge the safety of unidentified mixtures.

In the United States, most probiotics are sold as dietary supplements, which do not undergo the testing and approval process that drugs do. Manufacturers are responsible for making sure they’re safe before they’re marketed and that any claims made on the label are true. But there’s no guarantee that the types of bacteria listed on a label are effective for the condition you’re taking them for. Health benefits are strain-specific, and not all strains are necessarily useful, so you may want to consult a practitioner familiar with probiotics to discuss your options. As always, let your primary care provider know what you’re doing.