Our Better Health

Diet, Health, Fitness, Lifestyle & Wellness


1 Comment

What Are AGEs?

AGEs are toxic compounds. Their full name is Advanced Glycation Endproducts, and they form naturally in small amounts in our body. Until recently, scientists thought AGEs were just normal byproducts of our metabolic system linked to sugar.


New studies show that AGEs are present in large quantities in most of the foods we eat today. As new modes of food processing, applied by food industries, or popular methods of cooking expose food to dry-heat to make it safe, digestible and tasty, they also help raise AGEs to levels dangerous for the body.


Why do we consume foods that contain substances known to be toxic? It’s simple. AGEs are known to bring to raw nutrients those positive attributes we associate with our favorite meals. AGEs are responsible for the taste, appearance and the smell of foods we enjoy – the grilled burger and pizza and soft drinks and fried chicken; the bacon and corn chips and cookies. AGEs are at work whenever cooked food attracts our attention, awakens our senses and encourages us to take yet another bite, even when we’re already full. How many of us would consider eating these same foods raw? But before you think of thanking AGEs for all the pleasure they have given you over the years, consider this:

More than any other single dietary component, AGEs are now found to be linked to more diseases and health problems, including diabetesheart and kidney disease, but also dementiaAlzheimer’s diseasestrokearthritis,osteoporosisskin aging, poor wound healing, and periodontal disease.


Why are AGEs toxic?

1. AGEs are oxidants. They corrode our body the same way rust damages metal in a machine if it’s allowed to build up. Oxidation depletes our natural reserves of anti-oxidants, which are the “good guys”. Anti-oxidants are the substances that can neutralize the corrosive effects of AGEs, but only up to a point.
2. The body reacts to AGEs the same way it fights an infection, except that its capacity is limited. Our native defenses normally eliminate AGE toxins by mobilizing a low level of generalized inflammation, which is our body’s normal reaction to ”irritants”, such as bacteria. For example, a person with an infection – an “irritant” to the body – may experience a rise in body temperature – a “fever”, which indicates inflammation, but this will go away soon. Food AGEs, like bacteria, can also trigger inflammation but this time – since they come in often – it may not go away soon, and over time it can erode our self-defenses, as AGEs pile up in the body, like junk. And they continue to cause more oxidation (rusting) and inflammation (low “fever”), which may not become noticed for many years.

At worst, if inflammation is prolonged it will slowly damage every organ in the body – Most chronic diseases are associated with inflammation and high levels of AGEs. At best, AGEs speed up our body’s and mind’s aging

3. Animal fats are easily oxidized by AGEs.   When this happens, AGE-lipids from our food tend to stick to our arteries and cause blockage, high blood pressure or heart trouble. Or they settle in our waistline as AGE-fat, causing inflammation, obesity, insulin resistance. Insulin resistance occurs when insulin, a vital hormone, becomes less effective at lowering blood sugar and its levels become abnormally high. Excessive body weight is closely associated with this condition, frequently leading to diabetes.
4. AGEs also can cause proteins to stick together. With years, AGE-proteins become rigid. This is one reason why joints, muscles and tendons become stiff and inflexible over time. This is why blood vessels become thick and inelastic, a condition we call “hardening of the arteries”, which leads to high blood pressure and heart disease.
Advertisements


4 Comments

Omega-3s tied to lower risk of rheumatoid arthritis

By Veronica Hackethal, MD      NEW YORK       Thu Aug 22, 2013 

(Reuters Health) – Women who have diets high in omega-3 fatty acids derived from fish are less likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis than those who skimp on fish, new research suggests.

Researchers surveyed Swedish women about their diets and found over the course of more than seven years, long-term consumption of more than one serving of fatty fish each week was tied to a lower risk of developing the condition.

“This study is the first to attribute the protective effect of fish against rheumatoid arthritis to its content of omega-3 fatty acids,” Daniela Di Giuseppe, a doctoral student at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and lead author of the study, told Reuters Health in an email.

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that causes joint inflammation, deformities and disability. People with the condition also have a higher risk of heart disease, some infections, anxiety, depression and blood cancers like leukemia.

According to the American College of Rheumatology, between 0.5 and 1 percent of the U.S. population has rheumatoid arthritis. Women are two to three times more likely than men to develop the disease, which most commonly starts affecting people in their 60s.

Di Giuseppe and her colleagues followed over 32,000 women born between 1914 and 1948 who were part of the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Information about fish consumption was gathered from diet questionnaires sent to women in 1987 and 1997.

National registries were used to identify new diagnoses of rheumatoid arthritis between 2003 and 2010.

The researchers separated women into five groups based on the amount of fish-based omega-3 fatty acids in their diet, ranging from 0.21 grams or less per day to at least half a gram daily.

Eating 0.21 grams per day of omega-3 fatty acids equates to about one serving per week of salmon and other fatty fish, or four servings per week of lean fish such as cod.

During follow-up, 205 women developed rheumatoid arthritis, the researchers reported in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.


Long-term consumption of any fish at least once per week, compared to less than one weekly serving, was tied to a 29 percent lower risk of rheumatoid arthritis. However, that finding could have been due to chance, the researchers found.

Women who reported getting more than 0.21 grams of omega-3 fatty acids derived from fish per day both in 1987 and 1997 had a 52 percent decreased risk of developing the disease, compared to those who ate the least.

The researchers found a threshold effect, suggesting more omega-3s may not always be better. Below 0.35 grams per day, the risk of rheumatoid arthritis increased, but above it, the benefits seemed to taper off.

The results are consistent with other studies that have found threshold effects, and with recommendations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services, which advise eating at least two servings of fish per week.

The researchers concluded that “moderate consumption of fish is sufficient to reduce risk of diseases.”

Genes and lifestyle may both play a role in rheumatoid arthritis. Dr. Simon Helfgott, a rheumatoid arthritis researcher at Harvard Medical School in Boston, said the top three things people can do to prevent the disease are not smoke, avoid gum disease by having good oral hygiene and improve their diet.

“When we say diet there’s really only one influence that seems to affect rheumatoid arthritis and that’s fish consumption,” Helfgott, who was not involved in the new research, told Reuters Health.

Omega-3 fatty acids are used by the body to make molecules that help regulate inflammation, known as eicosanoids. The current thinking is that eicosanoids derived from essential fatty acids in meat promote more inflammation than those from omega-3 fatty acids in fish, researchers said.

“This study lends credence to a strongly considered hypothesis in rheumatology circles, which is that we might be able to intervene in preventing rheumatoid arthritis in some individuals,” Helfgott said.

Source: bit.ly/172ipzX Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, online August 12, 2013      www.reuters.com


Leave a comment

How Turmeric Reduces Oxidative Stress and Supports Your Brain and Heart

June 13, 2013  By Dylan Charles   Mae Chan, Prevent Disease   Waking Times

Curcumin has increasingly come under the scientific spotlight in recent years, with studies investigating its potential health benefits. It has even been found to outperform pharmaceuticals in preventing disease. Curcumin is a compound found in the spice turmeric which gives it a natural pigment. It has been linked to a range of health benefits, including potential protection against prostate cancer, Alzheimer’s, protection against heart failure, diabetes, and arthritis. Two studies add to that mix with benefits for arterial aging and cognition.

The first of the news studies, published in Experimental Gerontology and performed by scientists from the University of Colorado, found that curcumin was associated with improved vascular health in aging lab mice.

Curcumin is a diferuloylmethane derived from turmeric (popularly called “curry powder”) that has been shown to interfere with multiple cell signaling pathways, including cell cycle, proliferation, survival, invasion, metastasis and inflammation.

Adding curcumin to human cells with the blood cancer multiple myeloma, Dr. Bharat B. Aggarwal of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and his colleagues found, stopped the cells from replicating. And the cells that were left died.

Researchers at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, found that a combination of turmeric and phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) was effective against prostate cancer. PEITC is abundant in a group of vegetables that includes cauliflower, cabbage, watercress, winter cress, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale, kohlrabi and turnips.

Intake of curcumin at ‘physiologically attainable’ doses have recently been reported to slow the development of prostate cancers by jamming receptors linked to cancer tumour growth, say researchers.

Supplementing the chow of aged mice with 0.2% curcumin “ameliorates age-associated large elastic artery stiffening, NO-mediated vascular endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and increases in collagen […] in mice”, wrote the researchers, led by Bradley Fleenor.

Study Details

Fleenor and his co-workers gave old mice the equivalent of 14 grams per day of curcumin when compared with a 60 kg person.

“Because of curcumin’s poor absorption and rapid metabolism, clinical trials in humans also have used high doses of curcumin (8 to 12 g) similar to the amount our old mice consumed, while observing only infrequent, minor side effects,” they explained.

“Our results provide the first evidence that dietary curcumin supplementation ameliorates two clinically important markers of arterial dysfunction with aging: large elastic artery stiffening and endothelial dysfunction.

“Given its accessibility and safety, these pre-clinical findings provide the experimental basis for future translational studies assessing the potential for curcumin to treat arterial dysfunction with aging and reduce CVD risk in humans,” they concluded.

Healthy Brain Aging

The second curcumin study, published in Biogerontology and performed by researchers from Selcuk University in Turkey, examined the effects of curcumin on cognitive functions in old female rats.

Lab animals were given either curcumin or corn oil (control) for seven days, and a further five days when they were tested using the Morris water maze.

Results showed that curcumin supplementation decreased the time needed by the animals to reach the platform, and also decreased the total distance traveled by the rats.

“In addition to the behavioral testing, biochemical results showed that MDA levels decreased in brain tissue by curcumin supplementation,” they said. MDA (malondialdehyde) is a marker of oxidative stress.

“It may be concluded that, curcumin supplementation improves cognitive functions by decreasing the lipid peroxidation in brain tissue of aged female rats.”

One of the most comprehensive summaries of a review of 700 turmeric studies to date was published by the respected ethnobotanist James A. Duke, Phd. He showed that turmeric appears to outperform many pharmaceuticals in its effects against several chronic, debilitating diseases, and does so with virtually no adverse side effects.

Alzheimer’s 

Duke found more than 50 studies on turmeric’s effects in addressing Alzheimer’s disease. The reports indicate that extracts of turmeric contain a number of natural agents that block the formation of beta-amyloid, the substance responsible for the plaques that slowly obstruct cerebral function in Alzheimer’s disease.

Arthritis 

Turmeric contains more than two dozen anti-inflammatory compounds, including sixdifferent COX-2-inhibitors (the COX-2 enzyme promotes pain, swelling and inflammation; inhibitors selectively block that enzyme). By itself, writes Duke, curcumin – the component in turmeric most often cited for its healthful effects – is a multifaceted anti-inflammatory agent, and studies of the efficacy of curcumin have demonstrated positive changes in arthritic symptoms.

Cancer

Duke found more than 200 citations for turmeric and cancer and more than 700 for curcumin and cancer. He noted that in the handbookPhytochemicals: Mechanisms of Action, curcumin and/or turmeric were effective in animal models in prevention and/or treatment of colon cancer, mammary cancer, prostate cancer, murine hepato-carcinogenesis (liver cancer in rats), esophageal cancer, and oral cancer. Duke said that the effectiveness of the herb against these cancers compared favorably with that reported for pharmaceuticals. 

Weight Loss

Dietary curcumin can stall the spread of fat-tissue by inhibiting new blood vessel growth, called angiogenesis, which is necessary to build fat tissue. Curcumin-treated groups have been found to have less blood vessel growth in fat tissue. Blood glucose, triglyceride, fatty acid, cholesterol and liver fat levels also were lower.

Parkinson’s

A team of researchers has now demonstratedthat slow-wriggling alpha-synuclein proteins are the cause of clumping, or aggregation, which is the first step of diseases such as Parkinson’s. A new study led by Ahmad, which appears in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, shows that curcumin can help prevent clumping.

– Only 1 percent of the elderly in India develop Alzheimer’s disease – this is one-quarter the rate of Alzheimer’s development in North America. This difference is thought to be due in part to regular consumption of curry in India.
– Daily intake of curcumin may decrease the risk of developing polyps in the colon, which in turn, decreases the risk of developing colorectal cancer.
– Regular consumption of turmeric may help to ease pain and inflammation that accompanies arthritis.
– Curcumin may be helpful in the treatment of some cases of cystic fibrosis.
– Curcumin can help to effectively treat skin cancer cells.
– Turmeric may help to prevent the spread of breast cancer cells.

About the Author
Mae Chan holds degrees in both physiology and nutritional sciences. She is also blogger and and technology enthusiast with a passion for disseminating information about health.


8 Comments

Ginger is Better than Drugs for Pain, says Study

Michelle Schoffro Cook     May 3, 2013

A new study published in the journal Arthritis compared ginger extract to the common drugs betamethasone (cortisone) and ibuprofen for the treatment of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

While ibuprofen is a popular pain remedy (such as Advil or Motrin), in this study it showed no effect on cytokine production.  Cytokines are immune-regulating substances that can have inflammatory effects on the body, and are therefore linked to pain.  In this study, both betamethasone and ginger extract reduced cytokines in comparable amounts.   The authors of the study indicate that,n “ginger extract was as effective an anti-inflammatory agent as betamethasone in this in vitro model.”

While betamethasone has been used for decades to relieve pain, it is also linked with many serious side-effects, including:  vision problems, weight gain, swelling, shortness of breath, depression, seizures, pancreatitis, heart arrhythmias, muscle weakness, high blood pressure, severe headaches, anxiety, chest pains, sleep problems, acne, slow wound healing, and more.  Ginger, however, is a powerful anti-inflammatory that is safe for use. For more information, consult Arthritis-Proof.

Other research by Dr. Krishna C. Srivastava, a world-renowned researcher on the therapeutic effects of spices, at Odense University in Denmark, found that ginger is an effective and superior anti-pain remedy. In one study, Dr. Srivastava gave arthritic patients small amounts of ginger daily for three months.  The majority of people had significant improvements in pain, swelling, and morning stiffness by eating ginger daily.


Dr. Srivastava also found that ginger was superior to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like Tylenol or Advil because NSAIDs only work on one level:  to block the formation of inflammatory compounds.  Ginger, on the other hand, blocks the formation of the inflammatory compounds–prostaglandins and leukotrienes–and also has antioxidant effects that break down existing inflammation and acidity in the fluid within the joints.

Further research in the Journal of Pain also report that ginger is an effective natural anti-inflammatory that helps reduce pain and inflammation. Both raw ginger and heated ginger were used in the study with similar effectiveness. The scientists specifically explored ginger’s effects on muscle pain.

Ginger has been used medicinally for thousands of years in Ayurvedic medicine in India as a natural anti-inflammatory food.

How to Reap the Anti-Pain Benefits of Ginger (adapted from Arthritis-Proof):

-Add chopped, fresh ginger to soups, stews, stir-fries, and other recipes.  Ginger is delicious in many savory and sweet dishes alike.

-Add fresh ginger to a juicer while making juices.  It combines well with many other vegetables and fruits, such as carrots or apple.

-Ginger capsules (Zingiber officinale) are available for supplementation.  Follow package directions.

-Chopped, fresh ginger can be added to water and boiled in a pot for 45 minutes to an hour. Drink warm or with ice, as a tea.  Add a few drops of stevia to sweeten (stevia is a naturally-sweet herb).

-Ginger is available in alcohol tincture form.  A typical dose is 30 drops three times daily.  Avoid the alcohol extract if you are an alcoholic, suffering from liver disease, or diabetic.

Medicine never tasted so good.


Leave a comment

Chemicals in Cookware, Carpets Linked to Arthritis Risk

By Alan Mozes  HealthDay Reporter        February 14, 2013

THURSDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) — In what researchers are calling a first, a new analysis suggests that the greater a woman’s exposure to a type of common chemical compound called PFCs, the greater her risk for developing osteoarthritis.

Researchers did not find a similar risk among men regarding these chemicals, which are now found in everything from nonstick cookware to take-out containers and carpeting.

Osteoarthritis, the most common type of arthritis, causes pain and stiffness and involves degeneration of the cartilage in the joints.

And the study authors stressed that while their investigation identified a robust link between osteoarthritis and exposure to two specific PFC chemicals — known as PFOA and PFOS — for now the finding can only be described as an association, rather than a cause-and-effect relationship.

“But we did find a clear and strong association between exposure to [these] compounds and osteoarthritis, which is a very painful chronic disease,” said study lead author Sarah Uhl, who conducted the study while working as a researcher at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in New Haven, Conn.

“This adds to the body of information that we have suggesting that these highly persistent synthetic chemicals are of concern when it comes to the public health,” she said.

The new study appears in the Feb. 14 online issue of Environmental Health Perspectives.

Uhl noted that exposure to PFCs is nearly universal, given their inclusion in a vast array of products to enable (among other things) the grease-proofing of food packaging, waterproofing of rain gear, and textile stain protection.

Previous research has linked PFC exposure to a higher risk for the premature onset of menopause in women, higher levels of “bad” LDL cholesterol in men and women, and reduced effectiveness of routine vaccinations among children.

To explore a potential PFC-osteoarthritis connection, the authors looked at PFOA and PFOS exposure data collected between 2003 and 2008 by the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

The analysis covered more than 4,000 men and women between the ages of 20 and 84 for whom osteoarthritis status information was available.

The team found “significant associations” between osteoarthritis incidence and exposure to PFOA or PFOS among women but not men.

Women exposed to the highest levels of either chemical seemed to face up to nearly double the risk for developing osteoarthritis, compared to women exposed to the lowest levels.


The osteoarthritis-PFC connection also appeared to be stronger among younger women (between 20 and 49) than among older women (between 50 and 84). But the team said more follow-up research is needed to confirm the observation.

While the biological reason behind the potential connection remains unclear, the team suggested that the chemicals may have a particularly profound impact on hormonal balances for women.

“Our hormone systems are incredibly delicate and can be thrown off by tiny doses of hormone-disrupting chemicals,” Uhl said. “And processes like inflammation and cartilage repair are associated with our hormones, and are also associated with osteoarthritis.”

Whatever the culprit, Uhl cautioned that the problem is likely to persist for years to come despite a safety-driven downward trend in global PFOA/PFOS use.

“Once they get into the environment they just don’t go away,” she noted. “In people, they last years. So even if we were to reduce the use of these chemicals right away, they’re still going to be around and in our bodies for a long time,” she explained.

“Not being exposed is not an option, which is frustrating,” Uhl added. “But as consumers, I would say that one of the best things to do is to lead a healthy lifestyle, and get exercise and eat well. Because we’re finding that those steps can reduce susceptibility to factors that are outside our control.”

Commenting on the study, Dr. Joseph Guettler, an orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine specialist at Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., suggested that PFC exposure should be put in context as one of a wide number of variables that can potentially drive osteoarthritis risk.

“There’s genetics, weight and obesity, and previous injuries,” he noted. “There are some people who are biomechanically built in a certain way that predisposes them. And then others with certain [jobs] who put a lot of wear and tear on their body,” Guettler pointed out.

“And now this study seems to add an environmental factor, PFCs, to the list of traditional risk factors,” he continued.

“The fact that they didn’t find this association among men surprises me,” Guettler added. “They hypothesize that this may be due to hormonal differences, but I would expect that the main mechanism for PFCs influencing osteoarthritis would be through their effect on the inflammatory process. Because PFCs have been linked to inflammation, and we are well aware that inflammation has a significant negative impact on cartilage. So there definitely needs to be more research.”

Source: Healthday  news.health.com


1 Comment

Osteoarthritis Patients May Benefit From Drinking Tart Cherry Juice

Jun 2012

Tart cherries have the highest anti-inflammatory content of any food, according to researchers, and may help individuals suffering from osteoarthritis manage their disease.

The study, conducted by researchers from Oregon Health and Science University, involved 20 women aged 40-70 with inflammatory osteoarthritis. The study was presented May 30th at the American College of Sports Medicine Conference (ACSM) in San Francisco, California.

The researchers found that drinking tart cherry juice two times per day for three weeks resulted in considerable reductions in vital inflammation markers, especially for participants who had the highest inflammation levels at the start of the study.

Lead researcher of the study, Kerry Kuehl, M.D., Dr.PH., M.S., Oregon Health & Science University, said:

“With millions of Americans looking for ways to naturally manage pain, it’s promising that tart cherries can help, without the possible side effects often associated with arthritis medications. I’m intrigued by the potential for a real food to offer such a powerful anti-inflammatory benefit – especially for active adults.”

 

Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent type of arthritis. According to the Arthritis Foundation, athletes are at particular risk for developing osteoarthritis, due to excessive joint use that can a breakdown in cartilage and lead to pain and injury.

Kuehl’s previous research suggests that the inflammation benefits of tart cherries, available in dried, frozen and juice forms, could be particularly important for athletes. Kuehl found that individuals who drank tart cherry juice while training for a long distance run experienced considerably less pain after exercise than those who didn’t.

The antioxidant compounds in tart cherries, called anthocyanins, provide the fruit’s bright color and have been associated to high antioxidant capacity and reduced inflammation, at levels similar to some popular pain medications.

A daily dose of tart cherries (as cherry extract) reduced osteoarthritis pain by over 20% in most people, according to results from a study conducted by researchers at Baylor Research Institute.

Furthermore, the antioxidant compounds in cherries have also been shown to reduce muscle and joint soreness.

Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD, CSSD, LDN, Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center for Sports Medicine, said:

“Why not eat red when there’s so much science to support the anti-inflammatory benefits of this Super Fruit? And for athletes whose palates prefer the tart-sweet flavor profile of tart cherries, it’s the optimal ingredient.”

To learn more about the body of research supporting tart cherries’ pain-fighting properties click here to download The Red Report. There, you can also reference The Red Recovery Routine, a guide to help people train to manage pain with tart cherries.

Written By Grace Rattue 

source: Medical News Today


Leave a comment

Osteoarthritis Patients May Benefit From Drinking Tart Cherry Juice

Jun 2012

Tart cherries have the highest anti-inflammatory content of any food, according to researchers, and may help individuals suffering from osteoarthritis manage their disease.

The study, conducted by researchers from Oregon Health and Science University, involved 20 women aged 40-70 with inflammatory osteoarthritis. The study was presented May 30th at the American College of Sports Medicine Conference (ACSM) in San Francisco, California.

The researchers found that drinking tart cherry juice two times per day for three weeks resulted in considerable reductions in vital inflammation markers, especially for participants who had the highest inflammation levels at the start of the study.

Lead researcher of the study, Kerry Kuehl, M.D., Dr.PH., M.S., Oregon Health & Science University, said:

“With millions of Americans looking for ways to naturally manage pain, it’s promising that tart cherries can help, without the possible side effects often associated with arthritis medications. I’m intrigued by the potential for a real food to offer such a powerful anti-inflammatory benefit – especially for active adults.”

Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent type of arthritis. According to the Arthritis Foundation, athletes are at particular risk for developing osteoarthritis, due to excessive joint use that can a breakdown in cartilage and lead to pain and injury.

Kuehl’s previous research suggests that the inflammation benefits of tart cherries, available in dried, frozen and juice forms, could be particularly important for athletes. Kuehl found that individuals who drank tart cherry juice while training for a long distance run experienced considerably less pain after exercise than those who didn’t.

The antioxidant compounds in tart cherries, called anthocyanins, provide the fruit’s bright color and have been associated to high antioxidant capacity and reduced inflammation, at levels similar to some popular pain medications.

A daily dose of tart cherries (as cherry extract) reduced osteoarthritis pain by over 20% in most people, according to results from a study conducted by researchers at Baylor Research Institute.

Furthermore, the antioxidant compounds in cherries have also been shown to reduce muscle and joint soreness.

Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD, CSSD, LDN, Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center for Sports Medicine, said:

“Why not eat red when there’s so much science to support the anti-inflammatory benefits of this Super Fruit? And for athletes whose palates prefer the tart-sweet flavor profile of tart cherries, it’s the optimal ingredient.”

To learn more about the body of research supporting tart cherries’ pain-fighting properties click here to download The Red Report. There, you can also reference The Red Recovery Routine, a guide to help people train to manage pain with tart cherries.

Written By Grace Rattue 

source: Medical News Today