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Diet, Health, Fitness, Lifestyle & Wellness


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4 Foods That Can Improve Your Metabolism

A magic bullet solution does not exist, but there are some things that can encourage your body to burn a few extra calories.

Don’t listen to the Internet. There’s no such thing as a miracle calorie-burning food that will allow you to vegetate on the couch while melting off the pounds. If there were, gyms would go out of business instantly. According to registered dietitian Ellie Krieger, however, there are a few things that can help one’s metabolism work more efficiently, though this should not be considered a replacement for hard sweaty work.

In an article for the Washington Post, Krieger sifted through the “overhyped, over-extrapolated half-truths” that dominate millions of articles and podcasts to identify those items that might actually have metabolic value. She ended up with four – green tea, cayenne pepper, protein, and whole grains – but benefiting from them isn’t as simple as chowing down.

Green tea gets a lot of well-deserved attention, for it contains polyphenols (specifically, one called epigallocatechin gallate, or EGCG) and caffeine that increase the calories and fat your body burns. Studies show that a minimum of 250 milligrams of EGCG must be consumed in order for it to work. This translates to three cups daily of the highest-quality green tea, which isn’t too difficult for tea-lovers. Just be sure to buy the good stuff.

Cayenne pepper is a tough one because studies recommend consuming 10 grams a day; this works out to nearly 2 tablespoons. As anyone who’s eaten cayenne pepper knows, it’s nearly impossible to ingest that much, even if it’s spread out over three meals. But a small amount can help a bit, too:

“A 2011 Purdue University study looked at more palatable quantities of cayenne and found that even about half a teaspoon in one meal worked to increase energy expenditure, but only by 10 calories, which, incidentally, is the number of calories in one peanut.”

Protein is notable for automatically burning 20 to 30 percent of its own calories through the process of digestion. Krieger compares this to fat (0 to 3 percent) and carbohydrates (5 to 10 percent), though these are still crucial components of a well-rounded diet and should not be neglected in favor of excess protein.

Whole grains are similar to protein in that their digestion burns more calories than when you eat refined carbohydrates. Plus, you get the added benefit of fiber, which is sadly lacking in the typical American diet and is desperately needed for healthy guts.

Katherine Martinko     @feistyredhair       Living / Health       May 24, 2017
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Dietary Protein – From Any Source – May Help Muscle Health

Diets high in protein from any source – animals or plants – may help keep muscles big and strong as people age, according to a new study.

People with higher overall protein intake had higher muscle mass and stronger quadriceps, the muscle in front of the thigh, said lead author Kelsey Mangano of the University of Massachusetts in Lowell.

Proteins are found in meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy, vegetables, grains and nuts. The Institute of Medicine recommends adults get about 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight each day. That translates to about 56 grams (about 2 ounces) per day for a sedentary person who weighs 70 kg (about 154 pounds).

Protein is known to protect bone density, muscle mass and strength, but it’s been unclear whether the protein must come from specific food sources, the researchers write in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

For example, do people who get their proteins from meat benefit more than people who get their proteins from non-animal food sources, or vice versa.

The researchers used data from 2,986 men and women, ages 19 to 72, who filled out questionnaires about their diets between 2002 and 2005.

Overall, about 82 percent of participants were getting the recommended daily amount of protein. Their diets fell into one of six patterns: fast food and full fat dairy, fish, red meat, chicken, low fat milk, and legumes.

The researchers then looked to see if the participants’ dietary patterns were tied to their muscle mass, muscle strength and bone density.

muscles

Unlike past studies, the researchers found no links between dietary protein consumption and bone density, although they did find that dietary protein was tied to muscle mass and strength.

Muscle mass and strength were higher among people who consumed the most protein, compared to those who consumed the least.

People with the highest amounts of protein in their diets were eating about 1.8 grams per kilogram of body weight per day (or about 0.03 ounces per pound of body weight), compared to 0.8 grams per kilogram (about 0.01 ounces per pound) among those eating the least.

The results did not change based on people’s dietary patterns. A person getting a large amount of protein from red meat was benefiting as much as a person getting it from legumes.

“High protein diets do benefit most individuals,” said Mangano, who did the research while at Hebrew SeniorLife’s Institute for Aging Research. “It can be beneficial to maintaining muscle mass and strength – particularly as we age.”

She told Reuters Health it’s a positive message that people with dietary restrictions may still benefit from higher protein diets but cautioned the results are only one study with a group of mostly white participants.

Another study of older participants may help confirm whether the source of protein matters later in life, Mangano said. Her team previously looked at bone density in older adults and found that “people who were consuming most of their protein from red meat and processed meat had the lowest bone mineral density than other groups,” she said.

By Andrew M. Seaman
SOURCE: bit.ly/2k4hbTV The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, online February 8, 2017.


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20 Delicious High-Protein Foods to Eat

People argue about carbs, fats, and everything in between.

However, almost everyone agrees that protein is important.

Eating plenty of protein has numerous benefits.

It can help you lose weight (especially belly fat), and increase your muscle mass and strength, to name a few.

The recommended daily intake (RDI) is 46 grams for women, and 56 grams for men.

However, many health and fitness experts believe that we need much more than that.

Here is a list of 20 delicious foods that are high in protein.

1. Eggs

Whole eggs are among the healthiest and most nutritious foods on the planet.

They are loaded with vitamins, minerals, healthy fats, eye-protecting antioxidants and brain nutrients that most people don’t get enough of.

Whole eggs are high in protein, but egg whites are almost pure protein.

Protein content: 35% of calories in a whole egg. 1 large egg contains 6 grams of protein, with 78 calories.

2. Almonds

Almonds are a popular type of tree nut.

They are loaded with important nutrients, including fiber, vitamin E, manganese and magnesium.

Protein content: 13% of calories. 6 grams per 1 ounce (28 g) serving, with 161 calories.

Other High-Protein Nuts

Pistachios (13% of calories) and cashews (11% of calories).

3. Chicken Breast

Chicken breast is one of the most popular protein-rich foods.

If you eat it without the skin, the majority of the calories in it come from protein.

Chicken breast is also very easy to cook, and tastes delicious if you do it right.

Protein content: 80% of calories. 1 roasted chicken breast without skin contains 53 grams, with only 284 calories.

4. Oats

Oats are among the healthiest grains on the planet.

They are loaded with healthy fibers, magnesium, manganese, thiamin (vitamin B1) and several other nutrients.

Protein content: 15% of calories. Half a cup of raw oats contains 13 grams, with 303 calories.

5. Cottage Cheese

Cottage cheese is a type of cheese that tends to be very low in fat and calories.

It is loaded with calcium, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin B12, riboflavin (vitamin B2) and various other nutrients.

Protein content: 59% of calories. A cup (226 g) of cottage cheese with 2% fat contains 27 grams of protein, with 194 calories.

Other Types of Cheese That Are High in Protein

Parmesan cheese (38% of calories), swiss cheese (30%), mozzarella (29%) and cheddar (26%).

6. Greek Yogurt

Greek yogurt, also called strained yogurt, is a very thick type of yogurt.

It tastes delicious, has a creamy texture, and is high in many nutrients.

Protein content: Non-fat greek yogurt has protein at 48% of calories. One 170 gram (6 ounce) container has 17 grams of protein, with only 100 calories.

Just make sure to choose one without added sugar. Full-fat Greek yogurt is also very high in protein, but contains more calories.

Similar Options

Regular full-fat yogurt (24% of calories) and kefir (40%).

7. Milk

Milk is highly nutritious, but the problem is that a huge percentage of the world’s adults are intolerant to it.

However, if you tolerate milk and enjoy drinking it, then milk can be an excellent source of high-quality protein.

Milk contains a little bit of almost every single nutrient needed by the human body.

It is particularly high in calcium, phosphorus and riboflavin (vitamin B2).

Protein content: 21% of calories. 1 cup of whole milk contains 8 grams of protein, with 149 calories.

produce

8. Broccoli

Broccoli is an incredibly healthy vegetable, loaded with vitamin C, vitamin K, fiber and potassium.

Broccoli is also loaded with various bioactive nutrients believed to help protect against cancer.

Calorie for calorie, it is high in protein compared to most vegetables.

Protein content: 20% of calories. 1 cup of chopped broccoli (96 grams) contains 3 grams of protein, with only 31 calories.

9. Lean Beef

Lean beef is very high in protein, and also tastes delicious.

It is loaded with highly bioavailable iron, vitamin B12 and numerous other nutrients.

Protein content: 53% of calories. One 3 ounce (85 g) serving of cooked beef with 10% fat contains 22 grams of protein, with 184 calories.

If you’re on a low-carb diet, feel free to eat fatty cuts of beef instead of lean beef.

10. Tuna

Tuna is a very popular type of fish.

It is low in both fat and calories, so what we’re left with is mostly just protein.

Like other fish, tuna is also very high in various nutrients and contains a decent amount of omega-3 fatty acids.

Protein content: 94% of calories, in tuna canned in water. A cup (154) contains 39 grams of protein, with only 179 calories.

11. Quinoa

Quinoa is a seed/grain that is currently among the world’s most popular superfoods.

It is high in many vitamins, minerals and fiber, and is loaded with antioxidants.

Quinoa has numerous health benefits.

Protein content: 15% of calories. One cup (185 g) of cooked quinoa contains 8 grams, with 222 calories.

12. Whey Protein Supplements

When you’re pressed for time and unable to cook, a whey protein supplement can come in handy.

Whey is a type of high-quality protein from dairy foods, shown to be very effective at building muscle mass, and may help with weight loss.

Protein content: Varies between brands, can go over 90% of calories, with 20-50 grams of protein per serving.

13. Lentils

Lentils are a type of legume.

They are high in fiber, magnesium, potassium, iron, folate, copper, manganese and various other nutrients.

Lentils are among the world’s best sources of plant-based protein, and are an excellent food for vegetarians.

Protein content: 27% of calories. 1 cup (198 g) of boiled lentils contains 18 grams, with 230 calories.

Other High-Protein Legumes

Soybeans (33% of calories), chickpeas (19%) and kidney beans (24%).

14. Ezekiel Bread

Ezekiel bread is different from most other breads.

It is made of organic and sprouted whole grains and legumes, including millet, barley, spelt, wheat, soybeans and lentils.

Compared to most breads, ezekiel bread is very high in protein, fiber and various nutrients.

Protein content: 20% of calories. 1 slice contains 4 grams, with 80 calories.

15. Pumpkin Seeds

Pumpkins contain edible seeds called pumpkin seeds.

They are incredibly high in many nutrients, including iron, magnesium and zinc.

Protein content: 14% of calories. 1 ounce (28 g) contains 5 grams of protein, with 125 calories.

Other High-Protein Seeds

Flax seeds (12% of calories), sunflower seeds (12%) and chia seeds (11%).

16. Turkey Breast

Turkey breast is similar to chicken breast in many ways.

It consists mostly of protein, with very little fat and calories. It also tastes delicious.

Protein content: 70% of calories. One 3 ounce (85 g) serving contains 24 grams, with 146 calories.

17. Fish (All Types)

Fish is incredibly healthy, for various reasons.

It is loaded with various important nutrients, and tends to be very high in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids.

Protein content: Highly variable. Salmon is 46% protein, with 19 grams per 3 ounce (85 g) serving, with 175 calories.

18. Shrimp

Shrimp is a type of seafood.

It is low in calories, but loaded with various nutrients, including selenium and vitamin B12.

Like fish, shrimp also contains plenty of omega-3 fatty acids.

Protein content: 90% of calories. A 3 ounce (85 g) serving contains 18 grams, with only 84 calories.

19. Brussels Sprouts

The Brussels sprout is another high-protein vegetable, related to broccoli.

It is very high in fiber, vitamin C and other nutrients.

Protein content: 17% of calories. Half a cup (78 g) contains 2 grams of protein, with 28 calories.

20. Peanuts

Peanuts are incredibly delicious.

They are high in protein, fiber, magnesium and many studies show that they can help you lose weight.

Peanut butter is also high in protein, just make sure not to eat too much as it is quite “more-ish.”

Protein content: 16% of calories. One ounce (28 g) contains 7 grams, with 159 calories.

Take Home Message

The importance of eating enough protein can not be overstated.

It is the simplest, easiest and most delicious way to lose weight and have a better looking body. Period.

By Kris Gunnars, BSc
 


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How to stay strong in adulthood? Eat protein often, study says Diet

Graham Slaughter, CTVNews.ca    Published Thursday, April 21, 2016

A new study suggests that adults should eat significantly more protein than national guidelines currently recommend, and that portions should be split evenly throughout the day.

The high-protein diet, outlined in a joint study by the University of Mississippi and researchers at McMaster University, could help stave off muscle and strength loss in aging adults.

Researchers say the sweet spot is 30 grams to 45 grams of protein eaten one to two times per day – but one researcher suggests a person could see benefits with three to five meals at that amount. (For scale, an average chicken breast contains about 25 to 30 grams of protein.)

“That’s a pretty big dose of protein,” said researcher and professor Stuart Phillips, who studies protein and physical activity at McMaster University.

“But the more times people consume that dose, the greater their retention of muscle and the greater their strength that they measured using at least their legs, which is arguably the most important muscle that you want to preserve.”

The findings are based off information from 1,081 Americans between the ages of 50 and 85 collected from 1999 and 2002 by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, or NHANES.

Researchers zeroed in on the relationships between participants’ leg strength and how much protein they consumed. From that, they found a positive relationship between protein consumed in multiple meals and overall leg lean mass and strength.

‘A big jump’ from the norm

The conclusion may sound obvious – more protein, more strength – but the amount of protein researchers recommend far exceeds today’s national guidelines.

For example, a man weighing 80 kilograms (176 lbs.) requires 64 grams of protein under the recommended dietary allowance (RDA), a common benchmark in the U.S. and Canada. But Phillips suggests that such a person would benefit by boosting that protein intake to between 90 grams and 135 grams across three meals.

That’s more than double the national standard, but Phillips insists the suggestion isn’t “radical.”

“I think that it might shock some people and it’s definitely a big jump from the RDA, but I think that … there’s enough science now that’s beginning to emerge that challenges the adequacy of the RDA for older persons,” he said.

protein
A new study suggests that adults should eat significantly more protein
than national guidelines currently recommend,
and that portions should be split evenly throughout the day.

The study itself did not consider the type of protein consumed, but Phillips says the diet could be followed with either plant- or animal-sourced protein.

And the message isn’t simply that more protein is better, Phillips insists.

“It’s that you should probably distribute it in a balanced fashion. So take some of the protein that you’re eating at dinner and maybe consume a smaller portion there and consume more protein at breakfast and lunch time meals.”

The study did not specify the timing between meals, but Phillips suggested at least three hours.
He also point outs that the research is a step forward, but it’s not the final word on protein.

“This is a hypothesis generator rather than bona fide as fact,” he said.

Works for ‘anybody’

Phillips says the diet could work for “just about anybody,” and it becomes increasingly important for people to eat more protein in their forties and fifties when they may begin to lose muscle mass.
But people who don’t exercise often may experience muscle loss sooner in life and require a high-protein diet earlier.

“If you assume a fairly sedentary lifestyle and you have a fairly sedentary workplace, then you’re going to lose muscle mass at an earlier and probably more rapid rate than somebody else,” Phillips said.

Phillips compared muscle loss to bone mass loss in women going through menopause. Rather than fight the problem when it strikes, Phillips says it’s better to prepare with the appropriate diet.

“It’s definitely preventative. There’s no question,” he said.

Too much protein?

There are a couple “myths” associated with high-protein diets, Phillips says, including an increased likelihood of kidney failure or that it causes bones to “dissolve” by leeching calcium.

“Neither of those have any scientific basis,” says Phillips, whose research pertains particularly to protein. “I don’t see the smoking gun.”

But eating more protein could tip the scale on consumption of other nutrients, like carbohydrates and fiber, so Phillips says it’s important to keep a balanced diet and not “blindly” eat more protein.
Maintaining an active lifestyle is just as important as eating a balanced, protein-rich diet, Phillips says.

“I won’t say that one trumps the other … but I think you can cure a lot of evil from a disease and poor diet standpoint from a lot of good exercise,” he said.

The study will appear in the international journal Clinical Nutrition in the next few weeks.


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Top 10 Plant-Based Proteins To Add To Your Daily Routine

BY MEGHAN TELPNER    JANUARY 10, 2015

We all know protein is important. But even if we’re vaguely aware that we need to watch our protein intake, it’s easy to write it off as something only body builders or people on strict diets need to worry about. For women especially, it’s not uncommon to go without a good source of protein until the evening meal.

Protein is about more than building muscle. Each and every body part requires protein to function, from red and white blood cells to hair and skin (all made of protein.) Eating protein at every meal stabilizes our blood sugar levels, helping with everything from mood to weight management to nervous system health.

So how do we boost our protein intake without resorting to a big hunk o’ steak? It’s easy to get more protein in your diet without sacrificing your favorite meals. Power up your existing favourites with these easy-to-use plant-based sources of protein.

1. Fermented Protein Powder

Health Benefits: While regular vegan protein powders can sometimes be difficult to digest, the fermented variety supports healthy gut bacteria.

How To Use: Blend it in with your morning smoothie.

2. Ground Flaxseeds

Health Benefits: On top of being high in protein, flaxseeds are also a good source of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids. Their fiber content and mucilaginous nature also make them great for gut health.

How To Use: Sprinkle ground flaxseeds onto oatmeal or cooked veggies for a nutty flavour. You can also add ground flaxseeds to homemade baked goods. Recent studies have found that cooking flaxseeds leaves the omega-3 content intact.

3. Chia Seeds

Health Benefits: Like flaxseeds, chia seeds are high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids. Because they can absorb so much liquid (becoming a chia “gel”), they can also help prevent dehydration.

How To Use: Chia seeds can be added to smoothies, sprinkled on porridge, used to make puddings, or even as a grain-free “breading” for chicken or fish (if you eat it!).

4. Sunflower Seeds

Health Benefits: High in protein, sunflower seeds are also anti-inflammatory, which can help with symptoms of conditions like asthma and arthritis.

How To Use: Sunflower seeds can be sprinkled on salads and porridge. Ground sunflower seeds can also be used in place of flour to dust meats or added to grain-free baking recipes.

Sesame Seeds – Ten Amazing Health Benefits Of This Super-Seed

5. Nut Butters

Health Benefits: High in healthy fats and protein, nuts are wonderful for balancing your blood sugar levels, and using all-natural nut butters is a great way to get them in your diet.

How To Use: Add a scoop of almond butter to your green smoothies, spread some cashew butter on a homemade gluten-free muffin or replace the maple syrup on your oatmeal with a spoonful of your favourite nut butter variety.

6. Spirulina

Health Benefits: While “green” isn’t normally the color you’d think of when it comes to protein, this algae is actually a 65% highly-digestible protein. It’s also incredibly high in calcium, making it great for bone health.

How To Use: Spirulina makes for awesome addition to a green smoothie. It can be strong-tasting, so start slow!

7. Hemp Seeds

Health Benefits: Hemp seeds are packed with protein. They also contain the ideal balance of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids.

How To Use: Hemp seeds can be added to smoothies or sprinkled on top of salads. They are soft and don’t need straining, so they’re great for making dairy-free seed milk, too.

8. Alfalfa Sprouts

Health Benefits: Sprouts are rich in immune-boosting vitamin C, and alfalfa sprouts are made up of as much as 35% highly-digestible protein.

How To Use: Sprouts are an awesome salad-topper or great addition to any green smoothie. These are an easy one to grow yourself. Check out this handy sprouting tutorial.

9. Chickpea Flour

Health Benefits: Baked goods aren’t exactly the first thing protein source you’d think of, but swapping your usual flour for a high-protein, gluten-free one is a great way to add a protein boost to your day. Since chickpea flour is made of dried, ground chickpeas, it contains all the health benefits of these nutrient-packed beans, including antioxdiants, digestive support and blood sugar regulation.

How To Use: Chickpea flour works best in gluten-free baking recipes when it makes up no more than 25% of the total flour content, so mix and match it with other flours for best results.

10. Pumpkin Seeds

Health Benefits: Pumpkin seeds are high in magnesium, which key to nervous system health and is necessary for more than 300 chemical reactions in the human body. They’re also high in, you guessed it, protein!

How To Use: Pumpkin seeds can be added to your morning smoothie (use pumpkin seed butter if you don’t have a high-speed blender), used in baked goods or sprinkled on porridge. Lightly toasted pumpkin seeds also make an awesome salad topper!


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Should You Double Your Protein Intake?

February 16, 2015     By Alex Orlov, Life by DailyBurn

Think only twenty-something bodybuilders need to worry about their protein intake? Think again. A small study published this month in the American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism reveals that you might want to double the recommended daily amount of protein you’re eating as you age.

Protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle. But as you get older, you’ll naturally start to lose some of your muscle mass and strength due to a combination of factors—less physical activity, diet, and changing growth hormones. This can affect your balance and gait, leading to a greater risk of fall and fractures. Yet, scientists are beginning to discover that this type of physical decline in old age may not be as inevitable as we once thought. And one secret weapon to longevity and strength could be the amount of protein you’re eating.

Previous guidelines established by The Institute of Medicine recommend that adults consume .8g/kg of protein per day. This means a 140-pound person would require 50 grams of protein, roughly the equivalent of a whole chicken breast.

“The RDA [recommended daily amount] represents the lowest amount of protein that can be eaten to avoid symptoms of deficiency in most normal individuals,” says study author Il-Young Kim, PhD, research instructor in the Department of Geriatrics at the University of Arkansas. Hitting those levels is clutch because protein can curb your appetite and prevent weight gain, while also keeping your bones, skin and blood in tip-top shape. But it turns out we may have been underestimating how much protein seniors really need.

protein-snack-almonds
Photo: Getty Images

How much is enough?

For their study, researchers analyzed a group of 20 men and women, ages 52 to 71, over the course of four days. Each individual was randomly assigned to one of four test groups and given prepared meals for the duration of the study.

Ten individuals ate 0.8g/kg of protein a day, the current recommended daily amount. Half of those participants ate an uneven distribution of protein throughout the day (15% at breakfast, 20% at lunch and 65% at dinner). The other half spaced out their consumption evenly throughout the day (one-third at breakfast, lunch and dinner).

In another group, 10 individuals ate 1.5g/kg (0.7 g/lb) of protein a day—or twice as much as the current recommended daily levels for that age group. To help them hit this higher level of protein intake, researchers supplemented participants’ diets with milk protein concentrate. Half of these participants also consumed protein at uneven levels throughout the day, while the other half divided their protein consumption equally between meals.

Powered by protein

At the end of the study, the participants who ate twice the recommended daily level of protein experienced significantly greater levels of muscle protein synthesis and net protein balance, two important factors in muscle mass. Protein synthesis reflects the rate of production of new muscle protein, says Dr. Kim.

Surprisingly, the percentage of protein intake per meal did not have a significant effect on protein synthesis, though previous studies have shown that an even distribution of protein across meals was more beneficial.

While there’s no simple answer to why muscle mass decreases as someone ages, this study adds to a body of research investigating ways to boost longevity and strength in older adults. And one thing is clear: “Our results are consistent with a large and growing literature that the optimal level of protein intake is greater than the RDA for all adults,” says Dr. Kim.


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The Breakfast Nutrient That Keeps You Alert and Calm

Shubhra Krishan  November 27, 2014

What do the following breakfast menus have in common?

  • Coffee and doughnut.
  • Pancakes with syrup.
  • Milk with sweet cereal.

Yes, they are quick to put together and taste good. But if you start feeling irritable and jittery a few hours later, these very foods could be responsible, thanks to the quick blood sugar rise and crash they cause.

That’s because they have one other factor in common: they lack protein.

Protein takes longer for the stomach to digest, so it keeps you feeling satisfied for longer. This in turn helps keep blood sugar levels stable, easing feelings of anxiety and nervousness.

But this nerve-easing benefit goes even further when you eat proteins at breakfast. Researchers at the Franklin Institute explain that a morning meal high in protein raises your brain’s tyrosine levels. This helps your brain produce neurotransmitters called norepinephrine and dopamine, which give you energy and make you feel awake and alert.

vegan protein

As a bonus, protein-rich foods eaten in the morning help control cravings for fatty foods later in the day. Scientists at the University of Missouri found that those who ate a high-protein breakfast ate 26% fewer calories at lunch than those who ate the same number of calories but lower amounts of protein for breakfast. “Breakfasts that are high in protein also reduce cravings for savory – or high-fat – foods. On the other hand, if breakfast is skipped, these cravings continue to rise throughout the day,” observes Heather Leidy, a nutritionist who was part of the research team.

The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of protein is 46 grams for women between 19 and 70 years of age, and 56 grams for men in the same age bracket.

Here are some easy ways to add a little more protein—and thus a little more energy and calm—to your all-important morning meal:

  • An ounce of dry-roasted sunflower seeds gives you 5 grams of protein. They also contain magnesium, known to be a stress-reducing mineral that nurtures the health of your nerves. Add them to hot or cold cereal, or try them on scrambled egg.
  • Just 2 tablespoons of delicious peanut butter or almond butter, and you have about 8 grams of protein. Spread this on whole wheat toast, and enjoy a glass of skim milk for an additional 8 mood-boosting grams of protein.
  • 8 ounces of Greek yogurt gives you 11 grams of protein per serving. Studies have shown that the naturally occuring probiotics in this yogurt relieve stress and anxiety.
  • A whole wheat sandwich with hummus, almonds, and goat cheese can provide up to 22 grams of protein.
  • A single-serving cup of cottage cheese adds a whopping 28 grams of protein