Our Better Health

Diet, Health, Fitness, Lifestyle & Wellness


1 Comment

10 Everyday Habits To Make You A Calmer Person

Have you ever taken the time to observe a naturally calm person?

They’re a sight to behold — the way they glide through the day with ease, not rushed and exuding quiet confidence. I imagine you envy them as I do.

Truly calm people are a rare and exotic species that you can learn a lot from. Learn their common behaviors and attitudes, and you too can become an expert in responding to everyday stress and frustrations.

Here are 10 habits of naturally calm people:

1. They choose to walk.

To meetings across town, the shops up the road or to exercise their dog, calm people walk every day.

Get off the bus or train a stop early if you have to. This simple leg-stretching, head-clearing activity is mandatory for serenity.

2. They forgo rushing.

They leave plenty of time to get where they’re going, and they don’t cram too much in. If misadventure strikes, they drop something off their list, reschedule it, or they get there when they get there and apologize graciously.

Rushing disturbs the peace and has no value. Be determined to quit this noxious habit.

3. They prioritize self-care.

Sufficient sleep, good nutrition and physical activity are nonnegotiable for them. These essentials are not sacrificed for a deadline or anything else.

Make them the backbone of your day and you stand a good chance at the composure you crave.

4. They use routines.

Calm people minimize the strain on their working memory by doing some things the same way every day. Morning rituals, weekly wardrobe, meal plans or whatever, much of their day is predetermined.

Operating on autopilot will minimize decision-making and ease day-to-day pressure.

patience-is-the-calm

5. They practice being in the moment.

Most calm buffs meditate, do yoga, tai chi or other formal meditative practice. Others are able to pay attention and be fully present in their own chosen mindful activity.

Choose surfing, gardening or reading with your kids, but be diligent and practice regularly to get the stress reduction effect.

6. They use their phones judiciously.

Calm people are not at the mercy of their phones. They relegate them to their appropriate use as an intermittent tool for work and communication, maybe a source of music or news.

You will not achieve peace or poise in your life while your phone continues to dominate your day.

7. They self-regulate and exercise healthy boundaries.

They are self-aware and responsive to their mental, physical and emotional state. They take breaks, stretch and snack, or let off steam as required. Self-discipline and assertiveness enables them to say no, to ask for help and to stop work at a reasonable hour.

Practice tuning in and asserting your needs within yourself and with others, and enjoy feeling more in control.

8. They expect things to go awry.

Their unflappable nature comes from a deep knowing that life is unpredictable. They do not expect things to go to plan and they are ready to adjust to whatever the day throws their way.

By all means have a plan but be ready to change it at any moment.

9. They connect with the world authentically and meaningfully.

The calm person engages at some point each day in activity that is not about success, money or mere time-passing. An exchange with a stranger, a call with a parent, somewhere, there will be worthwhile connection. In cooking, gardening, any creative pursuit (including parenting and relationship development), somewhere there will be passion and care.

Remember what matters to you and honor it daily.

10. They embrace their small place in the world.

Their greater contentment is borne of their knowing their tiny place in the universe. They remain aware of the world beyond themselves — this prevents self-absorption.

They take their work and responsibilities seriously, but not themselves. They do not carry the weight of the world on their shoulders.

Along side meditation, service to others (through work, volunteering or caring for another) is a common way to gain this healthy perspective. It breeds self-compassion, gratitude and resilience.

Dedicate a good portion of your day to focusing on others and emulate their steady outlook.

All of these behaviors and attitudes are within your grasp, even though it may not be easy to make them a habit tomorrow — start small and start now and enjoy all the calm you deservedly achieve.

by Jacqueline Stone      March 5, 2015        source: www.mindbodygreen.com
Advertisements


2 Comments

8 Nutritious and Delicious Foods You Should Be Eating

These are key superfoods that should be a part of a healthy diet.

Spinach

It may be green and leafy, but spinach is no nutritional wallflower, and you know from reading Eat This, Not That!. This noted muscle builder is a rich source of plant-based omega-3s and folate, which help reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, and osteoporosis. Bonus: Folate also increases blood flow to the nether regions, helping to protect you against age-related sexual issues. And spinach is packed with lutein, a compound that fights macular degeneration (and may help your sex drive). Aim for 1 cup fresh spinach or 1/2 cup cooked per day.

SUBSTITUTES: Kale, bok choy, romaine lettuce

FIT IT IN: Make your salads with spinach; add spinach to scrambled eggs; drape it over pizza; mix it with marinara sauce and then microwave for an instant dip.

PINCH HITTER: Sesame Stir-Braised Kale > Heat 4 cloves minced garlic, 1 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger, and 1 tsp. sesame oil in a skillet. Add 2 Tbsp. water and 1 bunch kale (stemmed and chopped). Cover and cook for 3 minutes. Drain. Add 1 tsp. soy sauce and 1 Tbsp. sesame seeds.

Yogurt

Various cultures claim yogurt as their own creation, but the 2,000-year-old food’s health benefits are not disputed: Fermentation spawns hundreds of millions of probiotic organisms that serve as reinforcements to the battalions of beneficial bacteria in your body. That helps boost your immune system and helps provide protection against cancer. Not all yogurts are probiotic, though, so make sure the label says “live and active cultures.” Aim for 1 cup of the calcium and protein-rich goop a day. And choose wisely: Use our Best and Worst Yogurts.

SUBSTITUTES: Kefir, soy yogurt

FIT IT IN: Yogurt topped with blueberries, walnuts, flaxseed, and honey is the ultimate breakfast — or dessert. Plain low-fat yogurt is also a perfect base for creamy salad dressings and dips.

HOME RUN: Power Smoothie > Blend 1 cup low-fat yogurt, 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries, 1 cup carrot juice, and 1 cup fresh baby spinach for a nutrient-rich blast.

Tomatoes

There are two things you need to know about tomatoes: Red are the best, because they’re packed with more of the antioxidant lycopene, and processed tomatoes are just as potent as fresh ones, because it’s easier for the body to absorb the lycopene. Studies show that a diet rich in lycopene can decrease your risk of bladder, lung, prostate, skin, and stomach cancers, as well as reduce the risk of coronary artery disease. Aim for 22 mg of lycopene a day, which is about eight red cherry tomatoes or a glass of tomato juice. For the best picks in the produce aisle, click here.

SUBSTITUTES: Red watermelon, pink grapefruit, Japanese persimmon, papaya, guava

FIT IT IN: Pile on the ketchup and Ragú; guzzle low-sodium V8 and gazpacho; double the amount of tomato paste called for in a recipe.

PINCH HITTER: Red and Pink Fruit Bowl > Chop 1 small watermelon, 2 grapefruits, and 1 papaya. Garnish with mint.

Carrots

Most red, yellow, or orange vegetables and fruits are spiked with carotenoids — fat-soluble compounds that are associated with a reduction in a wide range of cancers, as well as reduced risk and severity of inflammatory conditions such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis — but none are as easy to prepare, or have as low a caloric density, as carrots. Aim for 1/2 cup a day.

SUBSTITUTES: Sweet potato, pumpkin, butternut squash, yellow bell pepper, mango

FIT IT IN: Raw baby carrots, sliced raw yellow pepper, butternut squash soup, baked sweet potato, pumpkin pie, mango sorbet, carrot cake

PINCH HITTER: Baked Sweet Potato Fries > Scrub and dry 2 sweet potatoes. Cut each into 8 slices, and then toss with olive oil and paprika. Spread on a baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes at 350°F. Turn and bake for 10 minutes more.

Carrots

Blueberries

Host to more antioxidants than any other North American fruit, blueberries can help prevent cancer, diabetes, and age-related memory changes (hence the nickname “brain berry”). Studies show that blueberries, which are rich in fiber and vitamins A and C, also boost cardiovascular health. Aim for 1 cup fresh blueberries a day, or 1/2 cup frozen or dried. Try this amazing blueberry smoothie!

SUBSTITUTES: Acai berries, purple grapes, prunes, raisins, strawberries

FIT IT IN: Blueberries maintain most of their power in dried, frozen, or jam form.

PINCH HITTER: Acai, an Amazonian berry, has even more antioxidants than the blueberry. Try acai juice from Sambazon or add 2 Tbsp. of acai pulp to cereal, yogurt, or a smoothie.

Black Beans

All beans are good for your heart, but none can boost your brain power like black beans. That’s because they’re full of anthocyanins, antioxidant compounds that have been shown to improve brain function. A daily 1/2-cup serving provides 8 grams of protein and 7.5 grams of fiber. It’s also low in calories and free of saturated fat.

SUBSTITUTES: Peas, lentils, and pinto, kidney, fava, and lima beans

FIT IT IN: Wrap black beans in a breakfast burrito; use both black beans and kidney beans in your chili; puree 1 cup black beans with 1/4 cup olive oil and roasted garlic for a healthy dip; add favas, limas, or peas to pasta dishes.

HOME RUN: Black Bean and Tomato Salsa > Dice 4 tomatoes, 1 onion, 3 cloves garlic, 2 jalapeños, 1 yellow bell pepper, and 1 mango. Mix in a can of black beans and garnish with 1/2 cup chopped cilantro and the juice of 2 limes.

Walnuts

Richer in heart-healthyomega-3s than salmon, loaded with more anti-inflammatory polyphenols than red wine, and packing half as much muscle-building protein as chicken, the walnut sounds like a Frankenfood, but it grows on trees. Other nuts combine only one or two of these features, not all three. A serving of walnuts — about 1 ounce, or 7 nuts — is good anytime, but especially as a post-workout recovery snack.

SUBSTITUTES: Almonds, peanuts, pistachios, macadamia nuts, hazelnuts

FIT IT IN: Sprinkle on top of salads; chop and add to pancake batter; spoon peanut butter into curries; grind and mix with olive oil to make a marinade for grilled fish or chicken.

HOME RUN: Mix 1 cup walnuts with 1/2 cup dried blueberries and 1/4 cup dark chocolate chunks.

Oats

The éminence grise of health food, oats garnered the FDA’s first seal of approval. They are packed with soluble fiber, which lowers the risk of heart disease. Yes, oats are loaded with carbs, but the release of those sugars is slowed by the fiber, and because oats also have 10 grams of protein per 1/2-cup serving, they deliver steady, muscle-friendly energy. Or have a sandwich, from our list of the Best and Worst Breakfast Sandwiches.

SUBSTITUTES: Quinoa, flaxseed, wild rice

FIT IT IN: Eat granolas and cereals that have a fiber content of at least 5 grams per serving. Sprinkle 2 Tbsp. ground flaxseed on cereals, salads, and yogurt.

PINCH HITTER: Quinoa Salad > Quinoa has twice the protein of most cereals, and fewer carbs. Boil 1 cup quinoa in 2 cups of water. Let cool. In a large bowl, toss it with 2 diced apples, 1 cup fresh blueberries, 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, and 1 cup plain fat-free yogurt.

By David Zinczenko / Huffington     September 22, 2015


Leave a comment

Here’s How To Cut High School Suicide Attempts 23%

Regular exercise for high school students can reduce suicide by 23%, a new study finds.

Exercise had a beneficial effect on both suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts.

The study is the first to show that exercise can help students who are being bullied.

Dr Jeremy Sibold, who led the research, said:

“I was surprised that it was that significant and that positive effects of exercise extended to kids actually trying to harm themselves.
Even if one kid is protected because we got them involved in an after-school activity or in a physical education program it’s worth it.”

The US survey of 13,583 high school students found that physical activity on four or more days was linked to a 23% reduction in suicidal ideation and attempts.

bullying sad teen child depression
Bullied high school students three times as likely to think about suicide.

The survey also revealed that:

  • 30% of students reported feeling sad for two or more weeks over the past year.
  • 22% reported suicidal thoughts.
  • 8.2% reported suicide attempts.

Bullied students were twice as likely to report sadness and three times as likely to think about suicide or try to act on those thoughts.

Suicide Awareness

Despite the benefits of exercise, many school administrators across the US are cutting physical education.

Currently only around half of young people in the US meet minimum standards for exercise (at least 60 minutes per day).

Dr Sibold said:

“It’s scary and frustrating that exercise isn’t more ubiquitous and that we don’t encourage it more in schools.
Instead, some kids are put on medication and told ‘good luck.’
If exercise reduces sadness, suicide ideation, and suicide attempts, then why in the world are we cutting physical education programs and making it harder for students to make athletic teams at such a critical age?”

The research was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (Sibold et al., 2015).
source: PsyBlog


1 Comment

What Is The Magic Sleep Number?

SEPTEMBER 16, 2015     Stuart Quan, MD, Contributing Editor

Bill Clinton (ex-President). Tracy Morgan (comedian). Cindy Lynn Baldwin (motor vehicle driver). What do these seemingly unrelated individuals have in common? The answer is that each either suffered from sleep deprivation or was victimized by someone who was sleep-deprived.
There is no doubt that all of us have gotten too little sleep at some point in our lives. For some of us, it is an isolated occurrence precipitated by a specific event, such as a death in the family or an upcoming stressful meeting. However, there is increasing evidence that America is becoming a country of chronically sleep-deficient citizens.

According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the percentage of adults sleeping fewer than 6 hours per night has increased by 31% since 1985. There are likely a number of explanations for this. They include the increasing demands of a 24-hour society, the increased use of artificial lighting, changing lifestyles that encourage late-night activities, and the widespread use of electronic devices such as tablets, laptop computers, and smartphones. The latter are particularly bad for sleep health because they emit blue wavelength light, which negatively impacts your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle and interferes with the onset of sleep.

Negative Health Effects of Sleep Deficiency

There are important consequences of insufficient sleep. On an individual level, sleep deficiency makes one more irritable and depressed, slows reaction times, and negatively affects mental and physical performance. In fact, 18 hours of continuous wakefulness has the same adverse effect on reaction time as being legally drunk! (The driver of the truck that hit Tracy Morgan’s vehicle had been awake for 28 hours straight.)

In addition, adequate sleep is necessary for optimal learning and memory. Experiments have shown that staying awake all night impairs the learning of new information. Therefore, the proverbial “all-nighter” that some of us practiced when we were in school probably worsened our test performance rather than helped it.

Chronic sleep deprivation exacts a toll as well. One and a half weeks of 6 hours’ sleep per night can have the same impact as staying awake for 24 hours straight. And just as important as the behavioral consequences of inadequate sleep are its negative effects on health. It is now becoming increasingly evident that sleep deficiency is a risk factor for hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and — not surprisingly — earlier death. In addition, inadequate sleep changes the levels of the hormones that control appetite, and this leads to increased hunger and a greater tendency for weight gain. Thus, sleep deficiency is a risk factor for obesity!

 

sleep

At Least 7 Hours of ZZZs Nightly

Because both acute and chronic insufficient sleep are bad for health, the CDC’s Healthy People 2020 campaign includes a goal to reduce sleep deficiency. However, the goal doesn’t specify exactly how much sleep is needed. To remedy this omission, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society, the two leading professional organizations in the fields of sleep medicine and research, released a joint consensus statement.

Based on current evidence, adults should aim for at least 7 hours of sleep a night for optimal health, and that getting fewer than 6 hours of sleep is associated with worse health outcomes. At the same time, there is insufficient evidence to determine whether getting between 6 and 7 hours of sleep a night is bad for health. A similar document from the National Sleep Foundation largely came to the same conclusions.

So, is 7 hours the magic sleep number? Perhaps. Future research may lead to some refinements, but for now, it should be the goal.

Can you make up for being short of sleep for a few days? The answer is not straightforward.  Many individuals get inadequate sleep on workdays and then attempt to recover their lost sleep on weekends. In such cases, there is generally an improvement in mood, as well as mental and physical performance, after “recovery” sleep. However, being able to reverse the effects of inadequate sleep on physical health is less certain. Recent observations indicate that lack of sleep may cause persistent negative effects on heart rate and the secretion of various inflammatory molecules. These may be risk factors for heart disease.

The Remedy is Simple

What can be done about sleep deficiency? The solution is simple: Get more sleep. On a personal level, this means making better lifestyle choices — for example, choosing to go to bed earlier in the evening instead of staying up to watch late-night television. For institutions and employers, this means creating a work environment that values the beneficial results of having employees who are not sleep-deprived: namely, fewer employee sick days, better productivity, and less use of health insurance benefits.

Although the prescription for more sleep appears to be inexpensive with no costly medications required, the personal and logistical hurdles can be formidable. Nevertheless, a target of at least 7 hours of sleep per night can be achieved. If sufficient numbers of individuals, businesses, and institutions make sleep a priority with status equal to good nutrition and fitness, then our society will be healthier and more productive — goals we all value.


Leave a comment

Marijuana Prohibition Can do More Harm Than Good, Doctors Tell Federal Parties

Put public health 1st in pot policies, addiction doctors suggest

CBC News     Posted: Sep 21, 2015

If Canada’s new government chooses to legalize marijuana beyond medical use then it should get into the business of controlling its supply and sale to prevent the rise of a “Big Cannabis,” addiction specialists say.

Cannabis policy could be an issue ahead of October’s federal election. The governing Conservative party favours the status quo, the competing Liberals seek to legalize, regulate and tax, and the New Democrats support decriminalization. The Green Party has said it would legalize and tax marijuana.

In a commentary published in Monday’s issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, addiction doctors describe the negative aspects of prohibiting cannabis use, such as fuelling the illegal drug trade and the high costs and harms associated with policing and prosecuting people.

“We’re hoping to provide some direction to policy-makers in Canada to encourage them to rethink their current policies around cannabis, to move away from prohibition because it doesn’t work and has a lot of harms associated with it,” Dr. Sheryl Spithoff, a family physician and addiction doctor at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto and one of the coauthors of the paper, said in an interview.

Often the harms from prohibition versus harms from potential increased use of cannabis are falsely pitted against each other, Spithoff and her team said. But cannabis prohibition has shown to have no effect on rates of use in developed countries.

“A frequently cited concern with legalization is that it will allow the rise of Big Cannabis, similar to Big Tobacco and Big Alcohol. These powerful multinational corporations have revenues and market expansion as their primary goals, with little consideration of the impact on public health. They increase tobacco and alcohol use by lobbying for favourable regulations and funding huge marketing campaigns. It is important that the regulations actively work against the establishment of Big Cannabis,” the authors wrote.

They suggest that policy-makers draw on the extensive research on tobacco, alcohol and cannabis policy frameworks developed by public health researchers to create a Canadian approach that maximizes benefits and minimizes harm of the potentially addictive substance.

pot
Often the harms from prohibition
versus harms from potential increased use of cannabis
are falsely pitted against each other, doctors say.

A 2013 UNICEF report found that the prevalence of self-reported cannabis use among youth aged 11, 13 and 15 in the preceding year was highest in Canada at 28 per cent. Findings in other countries included:

  • Norway — 4%.
  • Spain — 24%.
  • The Netherlands — 17%.
  • United Kingdom — 18%.
  • U.S. — 22%.

“Our hope with legalizing it is that less youth will have access to it,” Spithoff said. “We’ll be able to achieve our public health objectives, restricting access; limited hours that stores are open; and also young people won’t have to go the illegal market to access cannabis. Especially for young adults, that’s risky. It allows them to be exposed to other substances, more harmful substances.”

In 2014, the Toronto-based Centre for Addiction and Mental Health estimated enforcement of cannabis laws costs Canadians $1.2 billion a year.

Spithoff said the harms of prohibition to individuals include the criminal records of 500,000 Canadians because of cannabis possession, stigma around its use and barriers to medical marijuana treatment.

In the CMAJ paper, the authors also compare the experiences with marijuana policies in the Netherlands, Spain, Uruguay and three U.S. states, where cannabis is legal for recreational use.

For example, Spithoff said Uruguay has a model that could be adapted for use in Canada, because it puts public health first. In contrast, the Dutch model hasn’t solved the “back door” illegal supply problem.

Uruguay has licensed producers and a government commission that purchases cannabis from growers. The government sells it to individuals through pharmacies. The commission has control over production, quality and prices and has the ability to undercut the illegal market. Uruguay has also set a cutoff for cannabis-impaired driving.

Canada legalized marijuana for medical use in 2001. Detailed rules for commercial production and use of medical marijuana were implemented in 2014.

At a marijuana dispensary in Toronto, the idea of legalizing recreational pot was met with skepticism.

While cannabis advocate Amy Brown welcomes some regulation, she disagrees that pot is a public health concern any more than tobacco or alcohol. She worries about what government control would mean for growing the plant.

“The word ‘monopoly’ is where I disagree. A monopoly means complete and utter control of this product,” Brown said. “Maybe an advisory board would be beneficial so that moms and pops who are growing their own cannabis can still grow their own.”

Related

source: www.cbc.ca


2 Comments

10 “Rules” To Live By To Get Healthier

When it comes to living a healthy lifestyle, consistency is key. If you want to stop feeling lethargic and overweight, you have to stop being lazy. Sorry to be blunt. It’s all about creating a consistent lifestyle that promotes healthy eating and movement throughout the day!

I’m a personal trainer, but I am not always a perfect eater. I love pizza — I love bacon on my pizza. When I indulge, I make sure that two out of the three meals I eat that day are still healthy. On days that my body is sore and rundown, I still get up and move. Laying around only makes the soreness worse — get those muscles moving and get a good stretch or foam roll in.

I remind myself that even on my worst days, I can still walk. I can move. I don’t have to just sit around, I can strap on a backpack and walk around Nashville to grab a cup of coffee. Here are the other rules to follow to maintain a consistent, healthy lifestyle:

1. Get at least 10,000 steps every day.

This is the gold standard of consistency. It equals about five miles — here are some ways I make it happen every day:

  • Park far away
  • Use the stairs (want that strong booty, stairs are the best)
  • Walk the dog
  • Pack your lunch so that you can walk during at least half that break

2. Teach your body to be healthy by being consistent.

When you make being healthy a habit, your body know exactly what it’s in for and responds accordingly. If you’re able to stay away from sweets for an extended period, your body won’t crave them as much and when you do eat them, too much sugar will taste horrible! Try a piece of 80 percent dark chocolate for an after dinner treat and use gum to curb cravings.

3. Eat breakfast so that your body knows to be hungry.

Too many people have gotten used to not eating breakfast. It’s SO important! By eating it every day you actually will wake up hungry, and this is a good thing. That means your body is expecting the food and has started your metabolism already.

4. Sweat every day.

Our body’s cooling system is amazing. We shed all the heat by sweating. If you are a consistent trainer, your body knows what’s in store and will start cooling you down immediately. If your body isn’t used to working out, you will find yourself overheating due to your body’s idea of consistency — that you don’t need to sweat because you don’t work out. This will change over time!

5. Think long-term, not short-term.

Dieting provides short-sighted goals — 10-day juice cleanse, 3-day starvation, 30-days carb-free. What you really need is a consistent and fulfilling idea of eating clean and healthy that lasts a lifetime. Lower sugar, lower sodium, no starches in the evening and less booze (sorry).

483b0-walk160x144

6. Be active throughout the day.

One hour at the gym does not make an active lifestyle. Getting to the gym routinely is great and I commend everyone who does it. But saying, “That’s all folks,” for the rest of the day while you sit at a desk, car and couch does not make an active lifestyle. Consistency throughout the day will help you get and stay lean.

7. One workout does not make you strong and one day without weights does not ruin everything.

Consistency can be attained by sticking to your healthy lifestyle 80% of the time. Everyone needs a day to relax from the stress … just don’t let that make you feel guilty — enjoy your life!

8. One meal does not make you healthy and one meal does not make you fat.

When I ask about the meals my clients had the days before our workout together, I will always get a rundown of the healthiest options they chose. Yet they’ll also complain about why they aren’t losing weight. That one salad choice at lunch two days ago will not get you to your goal! Consistently choosing the better option will yield results and also increase your ability to refrain from temptation.

9. Drink water consistently throughout the day so you never feel thirsty.

If you don’t get enough water in your body before your workout, you won’t get as much out of your hard work. Blood brings oxygen to your muscles and brain. Blood is made up of quite a bit of water. If you are not hydrated, it is harder for you to get oxygen to where it needs to be.

The more you sweat, the more water you should drink. If you drink coffee or alcohol, you should also up your water intake.

10. Indulge on special occasions.

For me, this means eating pizza sparingly. Moderation within consistency is the biggest key to maintaining a healthy lifestyle.


1 Comment

10 Confucius Quotes That Can Change Your Life

March 18, 2015 

1. “Never impose on others what you would not choose for yourself.”

Remember to follow the “Golden Rule!”

2. “Real knowledge is to know the extent of one’s ignorance.”

Ignorance is the greatest cause of suffering. Enlightenment is our liberation.

3. “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

Another saying I love: 1000 repetitions answers all questions.

4. “Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it.”

You really have to open your mind to see the beauty in the world. See the world through clear eyes.

confucius-beauty

5. “The Superior Man is aware of Righteousness, the inferior man is aware of advantage.”

Another quote is “The object of the superior man is truth.”

6. “Wheresoever you go, go with all your heart.”

This is a great one. It’s important to be all in, all there, wherever you are.

7. “Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in getting up every time we do.”

We all will fail at some point or another. But true failure is only when we fail to get up.

8. “He who learns but does not think, is lost. He who thinks but does not learn is in great danger.”

There’s more to being well educated than reading books. Remember to think critically.

9. “He that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools.”

And remember, your mind is one of your most important tools.

10. “If you look into your own heart, and you find nothing wrong there, what is there to worry about? What is there to fear?”

This is one I could benefit from applying more to my own life. My life is good, all things considered. Yet I still feel some anxiety about my life and choices. Maybe that’s normal, but Confucius has a good point. If there’s nothing wrong in your heart, let go of your worry.