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Spices Stops Blood Clots Better Than Drugs

By Barbara Minton

Spices do a whole lot more than liven up food. Research has found that the active ingredients in several common spices can help keep you alive by preventing platelet aggregation and blood clot formation up to 29 times better than aspirin, offering a much safer alternative to anti-clotting drugs such as Plavix. And they do it without side effects.

Scientists in India have done extensive testing to determine the health benefits of spices traditionally used in Indian cuisine. The latest research to come from the Central Food Technological Research Institute evaluated the effect of the active principle spice compounds eugenol, capsaicin, piperine, quercetin, curcumin, cinnamaldehyde, and allyl sulphide on human platelet aggregation. They demonstrated that each compound evaluated was able to significantly inhibit blood clotting. Furthermore, the compounds performed their anti-platelet aggregation activity against several different factors that promote the clotting of blood.

Eugenol and capsaicin were found to be the most potent inhibitors of induced platelet aggregation. This ability was shown by the other tested compounds too in the declining order of curcumin, cinnamaldehyde, piperine, allyl sulphide, and quercetin. Eugenol was found to be 29-fold more potent than aspirin in inhibiting ararachidonic acid induced human platelet aggregation. Both eugenol and capsaicin inhibited production of clotting factors in a dose-dependent manner.

Cardiovascular disease and inflammation often go hand in hand. Earlier research by this team of scientists found that eugenol was highly effective at inhibiting inflammatory conditions in humans.

Spices are powerful medicines

Eugenol is the active compound that gives cloves their aroma. It is also found in cinnamon, nutmeg and lemon balm. Eugenol is also used medicinally as a local antiseptic and analgesic. It has antioxidant and pain relieving properties.

Spicing up food with cloves or other spices containing eugenol is best way to get this active compound into your diet. Eugenol is also available as essential oil for use in lotion and massage oil, or as aromatherapy in diffusers. Extracted eugenol should not be consumed internally.

Capsaicin is the active compound in hot peppers and the one that creates the heat. It is found in hot sauce, chili peppers, or as cayenne pepper. Aside from reducing platelet aggregation, capsaicin has a distinguished history as a cancer fighter through its ability to make cancer cells die. It is particularly effective against prostate and other hormone dependent cancers. Capsaicin sooths the digestive tract and may be a cure for inflammatory bowel disease. Eating chili peppers has been shown to protect against the effects of aspirin on the stomach.

Capsaicin protects the heart through other mechanisms besides inhibition of platelet aggregation. It reduces cholesterol and triglycerides, and has been shown able to dissolve fibrin, another action through which it can protect against blood clots. Cultures around the world that use hot peppers liberally have significantly lower rates of heart attack and stroke than cultures that do not.

Getting red pepper into the diet is easy. It is often kept on kitchen tables in the form of hot sauce, and sprinkled on meat, fish, side dishes, and snacks. Hot sauce is a natural accompaniment to Mexican and many other foods. Chili made with fresh tomatoes and hot peppers offers the two major players against prostate cancer in one meal. Even a simple bowl of beans gets up to dance when hot sauce is added.

For anyone wanting a quantifiable amount of capsaicin, there are capsules available.

Curcumin is one of the best known herbal healers. It is the active ingredient in turmeric, one of the staples of Indian cooking. Turmeric has been used for centuries to help treat health conditions and is also a tradition in Chinese medicine. It has recently been shown to strengthen and order cell membranes, making cells more resistant to infection and malignancy. Turmeric treats digestive issues, arthritis, menstrual problems, and liver and gallbladder issues. It is one of the best natural pain relievers and has shown to be more effective at relieving pain that NSAIDS such as ibuprofen, without side effects. Turmeric also offers strong defense against colitis.

While curcumin is preventing blood clot formation, it is also preventing the oxidation of cholesterol, offering protection against blood vessel damage and plaque build up that can lead to heart attack and cancer. There is even mounting evidence that curcumin can keep away neurodegenerative disease through its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and act as an antioxidant.

Turmeric can spice up anything from baked potatoes to elaborate curries. It is a highly tasty addition to lentils. Both turmeric and curcumin are widely available in capsule form.

Cinnamaldehyde comes from cinnamon and provides that heavenly fragrance and spicy taste loved by almost everyone from childhood on. Cinnamon has been a popular healer for more than 2000 years, and is a powerful regulator of blood sugar levels. Taking one half teaspoon a day can completely normalize blood sugar for many people. Cinnamon has a beneficial impact on cholesterol, lowering LDL levels. It is a digestive aid and antibacterial.

Piperine is what gives black pepper its kick. It provides an overall health boost and is effective against colon cancer and inflammation. Sprinkling black pepper on food increases the bioavailability of its nutrients. Piperine can be ordered in capsule or tablet.

Allyl sulfide is found in the oil of garlic and is one of the compounds that gives it such a unique odor. The health benefits of garlic are legendary. Allyl sulfide is not available as a supplement and must be obtained by eating garlic or buying garlic supplements. Crush a clove of fresh organic garlic just before eating and add it to your food. The taste will be sensational, and you will get all the benefits garlic has to offer. Many of these benefits are lost if garlic is added to food while it is cooking.

Buy traditional spices from a spice shop

Cloves, red pepper, turmeric, cinnamon, black pepper, and garlic are all sold at traditional supermarkets and discount stores, often in ground form. These products may add a small amount of flavor to food, but they are deficient for anyone trying to get their health benefits.

To buy high quality herbs, visit a local spice shop or order them from a spice retailer online. This way you can get organic herbs and spices that have their full range of nutrients and are not irradiated or sprayed with pesticide.

When you order herbs as tablets or capsules, unless the product states it is organic, it is not. Organic herbs sold in capsule form are difficult to find and are quite expensive. It is much more economical to purchase from a spice shop. The top spice shops package their spices in glass bottles that assure a tight seal. They can be kept in the freezer for many months.

Taking a quantified dose of a whole herb that is not encapsulated may seem like a chore, but it can be quickly gotten used to. Remember that these are herbs, not drugs, so there is not the need to be overly precise about the amount taken. Once you have established the amount you wish to take, put it in a 1/8 or 1/4 sized teaspoon, open your mouth, place it on the back of your tongue, and swallow with water or tea.

Source : alignlife.com Wakeup-world.com

About The Author: Barbara is a school psychologist, a published author in the area of personal finance, a breast cancer survivor using “alternative” treatments, a born existentialist, and a student of nature and all things natural.

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Getting a cat ups allergy risk in adults

NEW YORK | Tue Dec 27, 2011 12:15pm EST

(Reuters Health) – While having a cat as a kid may protect against future allergies, getting one in adulthood nearly doubles the chances of developing an immune reaction to it — the first step toward wheezing, sneezing and itchy eyes.

Chester, who won the most popular cat prize, looks on during a regional cat exhibition in Havana December 18, 2011. Credit: Reuters/Enrique de la OsaThat’s according to a study that found people with other allergies were at extra high risk of reacting to a new feline in the house.

“If you are an adult with asthma and/or allergies, you should think twice about getting a cat and particularly, if you do so, letting it into your bedroom,” said Dr. Andy Nish of the Allergy and Asthma Care Center in Gainesville, Georgia, who wasn’t involved in the new work.

For the study, researchers surveyed more than 6,000 adult Europeans twice over nine years and took blood samples. None of participants had antibodies against cat in their blood to begin with, meaning they weren’t sensitized to the animal’s dander.

Sensitization can also be measured in a skin prick test. It doesn’t necessarily lead to symptoms, but in many cases it is the harbinger of full-blown allergies.

About three percent of people who didn’t have a cat at either survey became sensitized over the study, compared to five percent of those who acquired a cat during those nine years.

Four in 10 of the newly sensitized also said they experienced allergy symptoms around animals — four times the rate seen among people without antibodies against cats.

The findings, by Dr. Mario Olivieri of the University Hospital of Verona in Italy and colleagues, appear in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

The team found that people who’d had a cat in childhood had a much smaller risk of becoming sensitized to it than those who were new cat owners.

“We thought that having a cat in early childhood may be protective against the development of cat allergy in childhood, but this study seems to indicate that that protection extends into adulthood,” Nish told Reuters Health by email.

It also turned out that only people who let their pet into the bedroom became sensitized.

“Keeping the cat out of the bedroom is a step I have always advised,” said Nish. “It is remarkable that none who did not allow the cat in the bedroom became sensitized.”

For people who have a cat and have become allergic, he recommended finding a new home for the pet.

“Second best is to keep the cat outdoors always,” Nish added. “If it comes in even occasionally, its dander will remain in the house for months. If the cat needs to be indoors, at least keep it out of your bedroom, consider a HEPA filter for your bedroom and consider washing the cat at least once a week.”

Nish said that there are also medical treatment options for people who can’t or won’t avoid pet contact, including allergy shots and immunotherapy.

SOURCE: bit.ly/vbZHAT The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, online December 12, 2011.

Reuters


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Health Basics: How do you live to be 110?

Tuesday, January 17, 2012 by: S. D. Wells


(NaturalNews) Tell someone you’re over 100 years old, and they might assume the worst right away, guessing that you have a dozen medication bottles next to the bed and that your health is quickly deteriorating. How could it be that a man who’s going on 111 and taking no medication,who simply eats fresh vegetables, olive oil, honey, cinnamon, garlic and chocolate, can bounce around his kitchen like he’s half his age?


When Bernando LaPallo of Mesa, Arizona tells his secrets of longevity and vitality, your jaw drops to the ground, wondering how he avoided all of the “ABCD’s” of those “senior years” – you know, Alzheimer’s, brittle bones, cancer and/or diabetes. Could it be that Western Medicine has it all wrong, and all we ever needed were raw veggies, super-foods, raw nuts and berries, and some barley soup? Maybe Medicare and Medicaid should broker a deal with the makers of power juicers and call it “Universal Healthcare.”

This August, 2012, Bernando LaPallo will turn 111 years of age, and he still has no problem walking at least a mile daily and receiving phone calls from people all around the world who want to hear how he’s done it, and how to make their own lives better. This author and role model keeps it so simple, you don’t need a recipe book or health guide to live to be 110 or better.

Here’s the (fountain of youth) breakdown and just a few of the raw food “natural medicines” you can turn into your own daily regimen, so your mind, body, and spirit can thrive well into triple digits:

• High quality, organic, cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil: use on the skin as lotion; use as salad dressing; known to lessen risks of colon cancer and heart disease.

• Dark, organic chocolate: reduces stress; helps with depression; lowers blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

• Organic garlic: helps fight coughs and colds; considered nature’s antibiotic; helps with digestion and intestinal problems.

• Organic cinnamon: antibacterial and antifungal; reduces proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells.

• Organic honey: helps you lose weight; nature’s energy booster; has antioxidant and antibacterial properties.

• Juice organic raw vegetables: A decent juicer costs less than $100.

And if you’re not familiar with this style of turning fresh “veggies” into a drink, try these surprisingly tasty combinations: Carrot, cucumber, sweet potato, a quarter size slice of fresh ginger, and freshly squeezed lime.


Celery, kale, Granny Smith apple for sweetness, and of course lemon or lime juice.

Also, you don’t have to let the vegetable pulp go to waste. Use it to enhance flavors in dishes or to bulk up your stew, or mix it with quinoa and maybe some diced onions as an accent.

Nature provides the untainted answer to building a strong vascular and immune system – one that can fight off infection, stress, arthritis, and even stave off the aging process. If you have not already, do further research into foods which are rich in antioxidants, enzymes, phyto-nutrients, and be sure to research foods that detoxify your body and destroy free radicals.

Eat right, exercise, don’t be fooled by the pharmaceutical and medical myths and scams, and you might just be fortunate enough to live long and prosper, like Bernando LaPallo. You know what they say, “Where there’s a will, there’s a way.”

Sources for this article include
http://www.oliveoilsource.com/page/beauty-and-olive-oil
http://greekfood.about.com/od/syrupssauces/r/oilvinegardress.htm
http://www.healingdaily.com/detoxification-diet/olive-oil.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GIHGzzpADU
http://www.sacredchocolate.com/sacred-chocolate/
http://www.globalhealingcenter.com/
http://www.powerjuicer.com/
http://agelesslivemorestore.com/
http://www.stevepavlina.com/forums/health-fitness/51483-109-year-old-raw-foodist.html
http://www.myfoxphoenix.com/dpp/morning_show/bernando-lapallo-celebrates-birthday-08172010


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Study: If Postmenopausal Women Lose Weight, They’re Better Off if They Keep It Off

By Rita Rubin

WebMD Health News

Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Dec. 16, 2011 — As you draw up your New Year’s resolutions, new research may provide added incentive for some older women to not only lose weight, but to keep it off.

The study of postmenopausal women suggests that when they regain weight — and previous research suggests about 80% of dieters eventually do — they don’t recover as much lean mass as they lost. As a result, they end up with more fat, even if they’re about the same weight as they were before the diet.

People lose lean tissue as well as fat when they shed pounds, the authors of the new study write. In fact, they write, studies have found that lean tissue represents roughly a quarter of total weight loss. Because the loss of muscle and bone can be especially detrimental to older people, “it is important to examine whether the benefits of weight loss outweigh the risks in this population.”

The scientists analyzed the body composition of 78 non-active postmenopausal women, ages 50-70, before and immediately after they’d completed a five-month-long diet. The researchers then weighed the women six and 12 months after the weight loss trial ended and analyzed the body composition of those who regained at least 4.4 pounds.

Most Regained Some Weight

On average, the women had lost about 12% of their body weight. By the six-month follow-up, about two-thirds of the women had regained some weight; by the 12-month follow-up, about three-quarters had, including 11 women who had gained more than they had lost.

After one year, 84% of the regainers had put on more than the benchmark of 4.4 pounds. Those were the women whose body composition was analyzed.

The women had lost twice as much fat as muscle when they were on a low-calorie diet. But afterward, they regained more than four times as much fat as muscle.

Previous studies of weight cycling were done in younger people, who tended to regain fat and lean tissue in the same proportion as they’d lost it, says researcher Barbara Nicklas, PhD, professor of geriatrics and gerontology at the Wake Forest School of Medicine.

Was It Aging or Weight Gain?

Because her study did not have a comparison group of postmenopausal women who had not lost and regained weight, Nicklas says, she and her co-authors can’t be certain that the shift in the women’s lean-tissue-to-fat composition wasn’t simply due to age. She says she’s seeking funding to study that question.

A 2009 paper on body composition changes in men and women 70-79 compared people who had lost at least 3% of their weight and then regained it with those whose weight remained stable. This weight cycling “may contribute to a net loss of lean mass in older men,” the authors concluded, calling for more research.

“We are still trying to figure out what are the natural changes over time of body composition,” Jung Sun Lee, PhD, author of the 2009 report and an assistant professor of gerontology at the University of Georgia, tells WebMD.

The information is especially important because heavy people are living longer than ever before, Lee says, and there are no clear guidelines for treating their obesity.

Some people say it’s best to leave it alone. “There are a few very vocal geriatricians who are totally against an older person losing weight,” Nicklas notes.

But despite the great likelihood that people will gain it back and the suggestion that it will have an unfavorable impact on their lean-tissue-to-fat composition, “I think there are huge benefits to losing weight,” she says. When older obese people deliberately slim down, their osteoarthritis improves, Nicklas says. They can get up out of chairs and climb stairs more easily. Even if they eventually regain all of the weight, she says, it usually takes a few years to do it.

Nicklas and her co-authors published their findings in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

SOURCES: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Sept, 1, 2011.Barbara Nicklas, PhD, professor of geriatrics and gerontology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem.Jung Sun Lee, PhD, assistant professor of gerontology, the University of Georgia, Athens.

©2011 WebMD, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

emedicinehealth


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Insomnia Can Be Dangerous, But There’s Rest for the Weary

Behavioral Therapy, Prescription Drugs More Effective Than Over-the-Counter Sleep Aids in Treating Insomnia, Report Suggests

By Rita Rubin
WebMD Health News

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD

Jan. 19, 2012 — If you find yourself tossing and turning most nights, unable to fall asleep, you’re in good company.

Insomnia, which is twice as common in women as in men, affects 6% to 10% of adults. It’s the most common sleep disorder, yet often goes undiagnosed and untreated, according to a new report. The consequences can be much more serious than daytime sleepiness. Research has linked insomnia to high blood pressure, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and other ailments.

Public awareness of insomnia has grown in recent years, in part because of TV commercials for the prescription drugs Lunesta and Ambien, but rates have been stable over the last couple of decades, says researcher Charles Morin, PhD, a psychology professor at Laval University in Quebec City.

Although there’s no standard definition for insomnia, suggested criteria include taking more than 30 minutes to fall asleep, waking up too early, or sleeping less than 6.5 hours a night, write Morin and co-author Ruth Benca, MD, PhD, a sleep disorders doctor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. If you meet any of those criteria and feel like you can’t focus during the day because you’re so tired, you might have insomnia, they say. But if you feel fine after sleeping less than 6.5 hours at night, you might just be a short sleeper.

Sleepless for Months

Although some people experience sleepless nights only occasionally, one study that followed people with insomnia over time found that nearly 70% said they were still dealing with it a year later, half up to three years later, according to the new report. The standard medical definition defines chronic insomnia disorder as at least three sleepless nights a week for at least three months.

There’s little evidence that over-the-counter sleep aids such as melatonin can give insomniacs a better night’s sleep, but behavioral therapy and prescription medications are effective, Morin and Benca write.

But people often are reluctant to seek help because they fear becoming physically dependent on the drugs used to treat insomnia, says Morin, who serves on the sleep disorders work group that defines mental conditions for the medical community.

“There are simple things that people can do to get a good night’s sleep,” he says. “Oftentimes, people think that the only thing that’s going to be done for their sleep problems is a drug prescription.”

Cognitive behavioral therapy, or “talk therapy,” has been shown to have long-lasting benefits in treating insomnia without any risk of bad side effects, Morin and Benca write. In treating insomnia, cognitive behavioral therapy involves such methods as relaxation techniques.

Behavioral sleep medicine is a fairly new field, Morin says, and, although it is cost-effective in the long run, it is not always a covered benefit.

People with insomnia often have other conditions, such as depression, anxiety, and chronic pain. “We should not treat just the depression” or the anxiety or the chronic pain, Morin says, “and assume the insomnia will go away.”

Morin and Benca published their report in The Lancet.

SOURCE: emedicinehealth

Charles Morin PhD, psychology professor, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.

©2012 WebMD, LLC. All Rights Reserved.


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Need to Exercise More? Think How It Will Help You Now

Shifting from long-term to short-term gains will resonate better, experts say

By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) — Health and fitness experts have for years tried to entice people to exercise more by flogging long-range benefits such as losing weight or avoiding long-term illness caused by chronic disease.

They might have been going about it all wrong. Research now appears to show that “improve your heart health” may be a less effective message than “feel better now.”

A University of Michigan study found that people are more apt to exercise when they’re given reasons that apply to their immediate, day-to-day life. For example, telling someone they will have more energy after working out seems to be a more effective motivation than telling them they will be less likely to develop diabetes.

Michelle Segar, the study’s lead author, said she believes the results indicate a need to “rebrand” exercise so that health organizations that promote exercise will see better results from their efforts.

“We need to develop new messaging that teaches people that physical activity is a way to reduce their stress in the moment, feel better in the moment, create more energy in the moment,” said Segar, a research investigator with the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at the University of Michigan. “You’re a more patient parent. You enjoy your work more. You don’t snap at your spouse as much. The benefits of exercise help you lead a more pleasant and productive life. The messaging needs to go there.”

The study focused on a randomly selected set of 385 women, 40 to 60 years old, who were given several questionnaires over the course of a year related to exercise and health.

The women’s responses indicated that they valued long-term goals like weight loss as much as short-term goals more directly linked to day-to-day quality of life, such as stress reduction. Nonetheless, Segar and her team found that women who cited short-term factors exercised more often than those who felt long-term goals were most important.

“The women who exercised for quality of life did significantly more exercise than the other two groups,” Segar said. Those who exercised based on daily quality of life worked out 15 percent to 34 percent more often, the study found.

This argues strongly for a reassessment of how exercise is promoted, Segar said.

“Health and healthy aging are very abstract,” she said. “We may endorse them as important, but the problem lies in the fact that we live very busy, complicated lives. When you’re looking at your daily to-do list, how compelling is fitting in exercise for a reason that’s far in the future, where you might never notice? If you’re exercising to enhance the quality of your daily life because it reduces your stress or improves your mood, you notice those things immediately. And if you don’t exercise, you immediately notice you feel worse.”

Messages that might resonate better with people who need to exercise more often, she said, include that exercise is a way to:

  • Become a more pleasant member of your family by feeling better.
  • Improve your productivity at work because working out makes your mind more focused.
  • Relieve day-to-day stress.
  • Improve your mood.
  • Enjoy higher levels of energy and vitality.
  • Spend more social time with others.
  • Take time to enjoy the outdoors.

Though those are compelling arguments for exercise, groups might want to think twice before removing long-term goals from their marketing strategies, said Walter Thompson, a professor of exercise science in the department of kinesiology and health at Georgia State University and a spokesman for the American College of Sports Medicine.

Long-term goals like weight loss tend to be measurable, whereas short-term goals like improved energy are largely subjective, Thompson said.

“The problem with the long-term goal is they can get to the 5½-months point and not lose a pound,” he said. “That’s the argument for the short-term goal. But without a long-term goal, it’s hard to come up with short-term goals.”

Short-term goals also might not apply to everyone because they’re subjective, he added.

“I like to run, but I remember days when I just felt miserable after my run,” Thompson said. “If I only looked at short-term goals, if I felt bad one day, I may not do it the second day.”

SOURCES: Michelle Segar, Ph.D., M.P.H., research investigator, Institute for Research on Women and Gender, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.; Walter Thompson, Ph.D., regents professor, exercise science, department of kinesiology and health, Georgia State University, Atlanta

Last Updated: Jan. 13, 2012

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

source: Healthday

 


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The Medicinal Wonder of Flaxseed

By Sayer JiWake Up World 20th January 2012


Flaxseed has remarkable therapeutic properties, with over 50 potential applications in the prevention and treatment of disease, as documented in the peer-reviewed biomedical literature itself*

Flaxseed’s role in breast cancer is one of the more compelling areas of research, considering this is the #1 form of cancer afflicting women today, and that most women still equate “prevention” with subjecting themselves to annual breast screenings involving highly carcinogenic 30 kVp gamma rays — overlooking entirely the role of diet, as well as avoidable chemical exposures. (More on this topic)

Given that flaxseed already has an exceptional nutritional profile, there are a broad range of reasons to incorporate it into the diet, even if only as a nourishing food. The main reason why the public is so enthralled by flaxseed (and rightly so!) is for its relatively high levels of omega-3 fatty acids, and the density of soothing, mucilaginous fiber it contains. Now, an accumulating body of scientific research reveals flaxseed’s hitherto secret ‘second life’ as a medicinal powerhouse, confirming how timelessly true was Hippocrates proclamation that food is also medicine.

In 2005, the journal Clinical Cancer Research published a placebo-controlled study involving patients who received a 25 gram flaxseed-containing muffin over the course of 32 days. After observing a reduction in tumor markers and an increase in programmed cell death (apoptosis) in the flaxseed-treated patients, the authors concluded: “Dietary flaxseed has the potential to reduce tumor growth in patients with breast cancer.”

Additional animal research supports flaxseed’s role in suppressing human breast cancer. In immunosuppressed mice (thymus removed), flaxseed and an extract of pure secoisolariciresinol diglucoside from flaxseed was capable of suppressing the estrogen-fed (estradiol-17 beta) growth of transplanted human breast cancer tumors.

The anti-cancer effects of flaxseed are not limited to breast cancer alone. Prostate cancer, another archetypally hormone-senstive cancer, is also benefited from this remarkable seed. In a 2008 study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, prostate cancer patients scheduled at least 21 days before prostate removal were randomnly assigned to one of 4 groups: 1) control (usual diet) 2) flaxseed-supplemented diet (30 g/d) 3) low-fat diet 4) flaxseed-supplemented, low-fat diet. The authors noted “Proliferation rates were significantly lower (P < 0.002) among men assigned to the flaxseed arms.” The study concluded: “Findings suggest that flaxseed is safe and associated with biological alterations that may be protective for prostate cancer.”

How does flaxseed work to prevent and/or regress hormone-associated cancers? The surprising answer is it is due to flaxseed’s distinctively hormonal and/or hormone-modulating activity. Flaxseed contains compounds known as phytoestrogens which have the ability to interact with cellular estrogen receptors. Although an increasingly common mantra in the conventional medical community (particularly in the field of oncology) is to identify all estrogens, including phytoestrogens, as “carcinogenic,” the weight of the evidence stands against this accusation, both in the case of soy and flaxseed. Our indexing project, for instance, has identified 36 studies on soy’s anti-breast cancer properties. It helps to understand the biochemistry in order to make sense of how a plant estrogen may actually reduce estrogen activity in the body…

The byproducts of flaxseed fermentive biotransformation in the colon: namely, enterodiol (END) and enterolactone (ENL), are known to modulate estrogen levels in tissues affected by these compounds. They are weakly estrogenic, which explains why they may alleviate hot flash symptoms in women dealing with hormone insufficiency, but are also antiestrogenic, capable of binding to estrogen receptors and blocking out more powerful estrogens (both endogenous and xenobiotic) at the same time. This is also known as Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulation (SERM): the ability to down-regulate estrogen activity in one tissue (breast), and up-regulate it in another (bone or brain). Soy contains the phytoestrogen compound genistein, also a byproduct of the bacterial biotransformation, which shares in this dual-acting SERM activity. Although drug companies have attempted to reproduce SERM-like affects with novel, synthetic compounds, often the unintended, adverse affects far outnumber the intended therapeutic ones. This is one reason why the discovery of pharmacologically active principles in foods, i.e. food as medicine, holds so much promise as the drug-driven system of conventional medicine begins to collapse under the growing weight of its own incompetence.

In the meantime, while you are enjoying flaxseed as a nourishing food, it is reassuring to know you may gain protection from the following health conditions in the process:

Breast Cancer (12 articles)

Dry Skin (2 articles)

Prostatic Hyperplasia (3 articles)

Breast Cancer: Prevention (3 articles)

Diabetes Mellitus: Type 2 (3 articles)

Aging Skin (2 articles)

High Cholesterol (2 articles)

Lupus Nephritis (2 articles)

Prostate Cancer (3 articles)

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity (1 article)

Blepharitis (1 article)

Cardiovascular Disease (1 article)

Cholesterol: LDL/HDL Raito (1 article)

Diabetes: Cardiovascular Disease (1 article)

Dyslipidemias (1 article)

Elevated CRP (1 article)

Estrogen Deficiency (1 article)

Hot Flash (1 article)

Meibomian gland dysfunction (1 article)

Metabolic Syndrome X (1 article)

Prostate: PSA Doubling Time (1 article)

Skin Diseases (1 article)

Colon Cancer (5 article)

Adiponectin: Low Levels (3 articles)

Polycystic Kidney Disease (3 articles)

Fatty Liver (2 articles)

Abdominal Obesity (1 article)

Arteriosclerosis (1 article)

And Many More…

*The information provided in this document is not intended to diagnosis, prevent, treat or cure any disease. By sharing this information, we are pointing the viewer to the research itself as source of education.

About the Author Sayer Ji is the founder of GreenMedInfo.com, the world’s largest, evidence-based, open-source, natural medicine database. Follow him on Facebook or Twitter

source: wakeup-world.com